Category: City of Los Angeles

Councilmember Englander proposes floating solar panels on reservoirs

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This week, Councilmember Mitchell Englander joined LADWP Chief Operating Officer Marty Adams, LADWP Chief Sustainability Officer Nancy Sutley, Los Angeles County Business Coalition President Mary Leslie, Actor/Environmental Activists Ed Begley Jr. and Matt Walsh, and students from Porter Ranch Community School to introduce legislation calling for LADWP to explore options to install “floating solar” panels on Los Angeles reservoirs.

Floating solar is an emerging and extremely efficient form of renewable clean energy. By covering the surface of reservoirs, floating solar conserves water by reducing evaporation and prevents harmful algae growth by blocking sunlight. Additionally, there is no land costs associated with the installation and there is greater efficiency of output due to the cooling effect of water.

unnamed (32)Los Angeles reservoirs provide hundreds of acres of local surface area that can be used as a platform for capturing solar energy.  The initial pilot calls for approximately 11.6 MegaWatts of solar installation on DWP reservoirs. That is enough energy to power approximately 3,190 homes per year and the offset 15.9 million lbs. of CO2 emissions per year or the equivalent of removing 1,567, cars from the road. LADWP estimates that Los Angeles Reservoirs have an achievable potential of 53 MW which translates to the electrical use of 21,000 homes annually or the equivalent of taking 10,320 cars off the road.

According to the State Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS), retail sellers and publicly owned utilities are required to procure 50 percent of their electricity from renewable energy resources by 2030.

Los Angeles is in a unique position to lead the country in the adoption of clean, renewable energy. With our geography, our climate, and our city-owned and operated utility, we have all the ingredients necessary to push for the wide-use and adoption of solar energy. By co-locating these panels on city-owned reservoirs, we eliminate the land-use cost and impacts of traditional solar panels.

Read the motion, here and watch news coverage below.

http://abc7.com/science/la-councilman-proposes-floating-solar-panels-on-reservoirs/3366827/

2018 State of the City Address: Highlights & Potential Partnerships for Neighborhood Councils

Mayor-Garcetti

Thank you to EmpowerLA’s Octaviano Rios for letting us share this thoughtful overview of Mayor Garcetti’s 2018 State of the City address, which Octaviano originally wrote for the Harbor area Neighborhood Councils that he supports. He highlights the Mayor’s callouts to Neighborhood Councils, and issues that Councils might wish to partner with the Mayor on during the coming year.

In his State of the City address Monday morning, Mayor Garcetti said that he needs the help of Angelenos to improve our quality of life in Los Angeles. This coming fiscal year, please consider joining the Mayor, the City Council, City departments, and community partners to spur economic growth in key industries, improve regional infrastructure connectivity, and ensure everyone benefits from the progress of the City.

In his address, the Mayor said the word “neighborhood” 25 times, which is a call not just to City Departments to take action, but a partnership opportunity for all Neighborhood Councils to engage in those instances where resources are being planned for neighborhoods. Here are a few objectives for the year: Read more »

Turning Down the Volume on Party Houses

Wendy Moore steals images

L.A. City Council to impose new fines in crackdown on ‘party houses’

On Wednesday, February 21st, the City Council unanimously approved an ordinance to rein in out-of-control party houses in Los Angeles. The ordinance creates a series of escalating fines against the homeowners or those who rent from them, who use their homes for massive gatherings that disturb neighbors, block the public right-of-way, and threaten public safety. It includes increasing fines of up to $8,000. The ordinance also requires those who violate the ordinance to post a public notice for 30 days notifying neighbors of their unlawful conduct.

The new law, first proposed by Councilman David Ryu in 2016, expands the definition of “loud and unruly conduct” to include loud noises, obstruction of a street or public right-of-way, public intoxication and more.

The ordinance, which was supported by a variety of neighborhood councils and community organizations, is meant to dissuade property owners from renting out their homes to professional party-throwers and reduce the likelihood of future violations, freeing up law enforcement personnel for other purposes.

“Too often, we have seen people renting out their homes for the express purpose of turning it into a venue for elaborate events,” Councilmember Paul Koretz noted. “These aren’t barbeques or birthday parties, these are massive events with cover fees and throngs of people tossing cigarette butts in fire prone areas. Trying to control them has been a challenge for the City because the laws and jurisdictional authority have not been clear. This ordinance changes that.”

The new ordinance provides the City with a focused set of procedures and punishments to better address the phenomenon.

“With this new ordinance, the party is over for these completely out-of-hand neighborhood headaches,” said Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer. “With escalating fines into the thousands of dollars, this ordinance has the teeth to help us continue our house party prosecutions with greater effectiveness.”

Apologies in advance to party fans Chad Kroeger and JT Parr.

Creek Fire’s Mass Horse Deaths Prompts Calls For Change

California Wildfires

After 29 horses died in last month’s San Fernando Valley wildfire, the City Council voted to address shortcomings to evacuation strategies.

In the wake of the deaths of 29 horses in last month’s Creek Fire in the San Fernando Valley, the Los Angeles City Council voted Friday to devise some new strategies on the evacuation of horses and other large animals during emergencies.

The wind-driven Creek Fire, which broke out near Sylmar on Dec. 5 and grew to more than 15,000 acres, destroyed a number of buildings, including a stable where the horses were killed.

The 11-0 vote by the council directs the Department of Animal Services, with the assistance of the fire and police departments and Los Angeles Equine Advisory Commission, to report on strategies to increase cooperation and partnership between the city and the equestrian community on the evacuation of horses and other large animals during emergencies.

Councilwoman Monica Rodriguez, who represents the area impacted by the Creek Fire, introduced the motion.

“I know that this would be a tremendous benefit to the city overall …,” she said. “I think it’s important to look at the lessons learned and be sure that we address some of our shortcomings so that we’re more effective in these evacuations going forward.”

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