Category: City of Los Angeles

LADOT’s People St Is Open for Business

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Communities can transform underused areas of L.A.’s largest public asset—our 7,500 miles of city streets—into vibrant and accessible public space with People St, a program of the City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT).

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“People St is a bottom-up, community-based approach to Read more »

Which buildings will survive the Big One? LA Times found 1,000+ that may not

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L.A.’s hidden earthquake dangers

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Thousands of Southern Californians live and work in a type of building vulnerable to collapse in an earthquake. To assess the danger, a team of Times reporters combed through thousands of city and county records to identify these buildings — concrete structures built before 1976. We found more than 1,000.

Experts say we’re overdue for a major earthquake. So find out where the dangers lie, and why so little has been done about them.

Interactive map: Where the buildings are»

Infographic: How concrete buildings fail»

Photos: The perils of concrete»

FAQ: Concrete buildings, earthquake safety and you»

Response: L.A.’s mayor weighs in»

Full coverage: The Times’ ongoing look at earthquake safety»

Time to Show Off

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When your friends visit L.A., where do you take them?

Sure, they’re excited to see our world famous landmarks, but tell me about your Los Angeles: the places your friends never knew about until you showed them.

When your friends arrive at LAX, the “Welcome to L.A.” photos at the airport are their first impression of our city. With your help, we’ll identify the most exciting places to feature in those photos. I want to showcase the real L.A. — your L.A.

What do you want to see in those pictures? Suggest your favorite spots to show off our city.

One of the most talented and sought-after photographers in the world, L.A.’s own Catherine Opie, has volunteered to create a series of images to welcome people when they arrive at LAX.

Follow this link to recommend and vote on shooting locations. Your suggestion may become the next photo at LAX.

We Angelenos have so much to be proud of — let’s show the world what we got.

Eric Garcetti
Mayor

The Fastest Route to City Hall (Updated)

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A new Mayor, a new City Attorney, a new City Controller, and six new Councilmembers join two incumbent Councilmembers in guiding the largest city in the most populated state in the most powerful country in the world and they need your feedback.

The quickest way to check in is by emailing them.  Tell them who you are, tell them where you live, tell them the issue, and tell them what you like.

Be specific, be concise, and be polite.

Here are the email addresses for LA’s Leadership:

Contact the Mayor and City Council:

Mayor Eric Garcetti – [email protected]
Click HERE to determine your Council District and contact your councilman below.
Gilbert Cedillo, CD 1 – [email protected]
Paul Krekorian, CD2 – [email protected]
Bob Blumenfield, CD 3 – [email protected]
Tom LaBonge, CD 4 – [email protected]
Paul Koretz, CD 5 – [email protected]
vacant, CD 6 – [email protected]
Felipe Fuentes, CD 7 – [email protected]
Bernard Parks, CD 8 – [email protected]
Curren D. Price, Jr, CD 9 – [email protected]
Herb J. Wesson, Jr. CD 10 – [email protected]
Mike Bonin, CD 11 – [email protected]
Mitch Englander, CD 12 – [email protected]
Mitch O’Farrell, CD 13 – [email protected]
Jose Huizar, CD 14 – [email protected]
Joe Buscaino, CD 15 – [email protected]

To contact the Mayor and ALL Councilmembers, email [email protected] and your email will also go to the City Clerk who will attach it to any specified Council Files.

Eric Garcetti Wins Mayor Race, Pot Shop Limit Passes

LA Mayoral Candidates Go To The Polls On Election Day

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Eric Garcetti triumphs in the LA mayoral race (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty)

It’s official: Eric Garcetti has won the race for Los Angeles mayor over Wendy Greuel, who conceded this morning.

With 100 percent of precincts reporting, Garcetti earned 54 percent of the votes and Greuel had 46 percent, ABC News reports.

Garcetti is both LA’s first Jewish mayor and, at 42, its youngest mayor in 100 years, according to the LA Times.

He tweeted his thanks to the voters: “Thank you Los Angeles–the hard work begins but I am honored to lead this city for the next four years. Let’s make this a great city again.”

Eric Garcetti Mayoral Tweet
Last night, things looked too close to call, with both candidates appearing optimistic about their chances. Read more »

Final EIR of City of Los Angeles’ Proposed Single-Use Carryout Bag Ordinance

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plasticbagThe City of Los Angeles is proposing to adopt and implement an ordinance to ban single-use plastic carryout bags, charge a fee on paper bags, and promote the use of reusable bags at specified retailers in the City of Los Angeles.  The Final EIR is available at City of Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation, 1149 S. Broadway, 5th Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90015; at www.lacitysan.org under What’s New…; and at the following public libraries:

  • Central Library, 630 W 5th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90071
  • Van Nuys Branch Library, 6250 Sylmar Ave., Van Nuys, CA 91401
  • West L. A. Regional Branch Library, 11360 Santa Monica Bl., Los Angeles, CA 90025
  • San Pedro Regional Branch Library, 931 S. Gaffey Street, San Pedro, CA 90731
  • Granada Hills Branch, 10640 Petit Avenue, Granada Hills, CA 91344

Grading Los Angeles’ Streets

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L.A. full of roads to ruin for cars

The city gives its road network an average grade of C. But a Times analysis finds wide disparities, and they’re not driven by wealth or political power.

Explore pavement quality ratings for each of the 68,000 street segments in L.A., graded from A to F.

Gregory Leskin

From the L.A. Times, May 4, 2013

A drive along Angus Street in hilly Silver Lake requires navigating a gantlet of buckled concrete slabs and dirt-filled cracks.

But on South Seabluff Drive in Playa Vista the ride is smooth, the pavement is black and you can smell the fresh asphalt.

Despite the city’s best efforts to keep up with the constant flood of road repairs, Los Angeles is a city divided — by its potholes, cracks and ruts.

Interactive map: See your street’s grade

A Times analysis of street inspection data found Read more »

Today Is the Last Day to Register to Vote in the May 21 Mayoral Election

Voter Registration Deadline

Eligible residents must register to vote by Monday, May 6, 2013 in order to be able to vote in the May 21, 2013 City of Los Angeles General Municipal and Special Elections.

To be eligible to vote, you must be a citizen of the United States and 18 years old by Election Day. Registered voters who have moved or changed their names since the last election must re-register to vote. Voter registration is handled by the Office of the California Secretary of State. You can register to vote from the following sources:

  • Contact the Office of the California Secretary of State. Complete your registration online at https://rtv.sos.ca.gov/elections/register-to-vote/, or download the form at http://www.eac.gov/assets/1/Documents/Federal%20Voter%20Registration_1209_en9242012.pdf and complete and return by mail.
  • Contact the Office of the Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk’s (RR/CC) by visiting their website at www.lavote.net or email them at [email protected]. You can also call them at toll-free at (800) 481-VOTE or direct at (562) 466-1310, or register in person at the RR/CC Office at 12400 Imperial Highway, Norwalk, CA 90650
  • Voter registration forms may also be available at the public counter of most Los Angeles City and County buildings, libraries, fire stations, post offices, and Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) offices

The Official Sample Ballot for the May 21, 2013 City of Los Angeles General Municipal and Special Elections (available in English and the eight Federally-mandated languages of Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, Tagalog, Thai, and Vietnamese) is available on the Election Division’s website at http://clerk.lacity.org/Elections/ under the “Polling Place and Official Sample Ballot Look Up” link. Copies of the Official Sample Ballot and Voter Information Pamphlet are also available by contacting the Office of the City Clerk – Election Division by May 17, 2013.

Mayor Villaraigosa Announces $5 Million in Grants for Earthquake Early Warning System

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Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa joined with the US Geological Survey and the Los Angeles/Long Beach Urban Areas Security Initiative (UASI) Approval Authority members to announce $5 million in federal funds for the region’s Earthquake Early Warning System.

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“Our partners at the US Geological Survey and Caltech have been working on the development of a cutting-edge early warning system.” Mayor Villaraigosa said. “We’re proud to provide this additional funding to improve the system’s capacity and bring it to the level required to make earthquake early warning a reality in Southern California.”

The USGS, in partnership with CalTech, UC Berkeley, and the Southern California Earthquake Center, has been developing an Earthquake Early Warning system for Southern California since 2006.

The objective of earthquake early warning is to rapidly detect the initiation of an earthquake, estimate the level of ground shaking to be expected, and issue a warning before significant ground shaking starts. This can be done with sensors placed near active fault zones that detect the first energy waves to radiate from an earthquake.  Those first waves travel at the speed of sound but cause little damage.  The following waves, which bring the strong shaking that causes most of the damage, travel slower.  The greater the distance from the epicenter, the longer the warning time which can range from a few seconds to a few tens of seconds.

Those seconds could:

  • allow people to drop, cover, and hold on and grant businesses time to shut down and move workers to safe locations,
  • give medical professionals time to stop delicate procedures,
  • protect travelers by providing time for trains to slow or stop, for elevator doors to open, for bridge traffic to clear, for slowing or stopping traffic, and even stopping landings and take-offs at airports, and
  • enable emergency responders to prepare by opening fire station doors and starting generators.

When the magnitude 9.0 earthquake struck Japan in March 2011, 50 million residents received warning in advance.  The country’s earthquake information systems gave people about 200 miles away in Tokyo up to 30 seconds or more to prepare before strong shaking from the epicenter reached them. People closer to the epicenter, which experienced the strongest shaking from this offshore event, received up to 5-10 seconds warning.

For further information, visit www.shakealert.org

The Fastest Route to City Hall

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In a city the size of Los Angeles, one of the fastest routes to City Hall is the internet. In the time it takes to find your car keys, you can be online and communicating with the Mayor and the City Council.

Effective Neighborhood Council advocates typically know three things; they know the issue, they know what they want, and they know who can help them.

Then they do something about it. Here are a few tips for effective email advocacy, followed by the email addresses of the Mayor and the City Council, complemented by a simple link that allows you to email the Mayor and the City Council with one click.

Identify yourself and your Neighborhood Council. Let them know that you are a voting resident or a taxpaying business owner or an active parent volunteer.

Be polite and professional. You can disagree, you can be firm and forceful, but always remember that you are creating a public document and your objective is to persuade.

Be clear and state your objective. You can complain all day long but if you don’t get to the point and ask for help, compliance, or support,  you won’t get what you want.

Look for common ground. We live in a great city and we’re all partners in making it even better. Let people know that you want to help them help you.

Encourage others to join you. There is strength in numbers and if you take to time to write a persuasive email, share it with others so that they can support you.

Be grateful. Take the time to write, even when you aren’t asking for something or opposed to something. Become the memorable constituent by noticing the good and by thanking your leadership when they get it right.

Contact the Mayor and City Council:

Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa – [email protected]

Click HERE to determine your Council District and contact your councilman below.

Ed Reyes, CD 1 – [email protected]

Paul Krekorian, CD2 – [email protected]

Dennis P. Zine, CD 3 – [email protected]

Tom LaBonge, CD 4 – [email protected]

Paul Koretz, CD 5 – [email protected]

vacant, CD 6 – [email protected]

Richard Alarcon, CD 7 – [email protected]

Bernard Parks, CD 8 – [email protected]

Jan Perry, CD 9 – [email protected]

Herb J. Wesson, Jr. CD 10 – [email protected]

Bill Rosendahl, CD 11 – [email protected]

Mitch Englander, CD 12 – [email protected]

Eric Garcetti, CD 13 – [email protected]

Jose Huizar, CD 14 – [email protected]

Joe Buscaino, CD 15 – [email protected]

To contact the Mayor and ALL Councilmembers, email [email protected]rLA.org which will forward your email to ALL emails above.

Mayor’s Final State of the City Address

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Mayor Villaraigosa gave his final State of the City speech Tuesday evening at UCLA’s Royce Hall. Below is his statement following the speech and links to view it in case you missed it.

To My Fellow Angelenos,

I write to you tonight to thank you for the privilege of serving as your Mayor for the past eight years. Together we have been on a journey as Los Angeles continues its march into the future.

I hope you had the chance to join me last night at UCLA’s Royce Hall as I delivered my eighth and final State of the City address. I was fortunate enough to have the time to tell my story and demonstrate how after the worst recession in generations, LA is once again  “On the Move.”

None of the work we have accomplished in the past eight years could have been done without the partnership, collaboration and teamwork of so many Angelenos and for that you have my deepest gratitude.

If you were unable to attend the speech, I invite you to view the introductory video, “LA Voices,” and the speech itself, which can be accessed via the links below.

LA Voices: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wba-6-G_O_Y

State of the City address:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3bFCz0uYHJw&feature=youtu.be

Yours Truly,
Antonio R. Villaraigosa

Mayor to Eliminate Neighborhood Council Election Funding

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This week neighborhood councils were blindsided by the Mayor’s office.  The Mayor said that because the Proposition A sales tax measure failed to pass, he will not include funding for 2014 neighborhood council elections in his proposed budget.  If neighborhood councils want elections, they will need to collectively surrender 20 percent of their proposed $37,000 allocations to pay for it.

City Attorney Carmen Trutanich sent the Mayor a message yesterday, March 14, (with copies to Herb Wesson, Paul Krekorian and Miguel Santana, the City’s financial chief ) saying that cutting neighborhood council funding to a level where they could not perform their function could violate the City Charter.

Trutanich urged the Mayor to “provide full funding to all neighborhood councils” so they can do what the Charter asks them to do.

Here’s the letter in full.

The City Attorney’s letter is the result of requests for support and action from the Neighborhood Council Budget Advocates, chaired by Jay Handal.

City of Los Angeles Releases a 3-1-1 App and a Cleaner Website

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L.A. 311 App

Los Angeles residents will be able to complain about graffiti, abandoned furniture, potholes, broken street lights and fallen trees using their iPhone and Android smartphones starting March 18.

Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa unveiled the My LA 311 mobile app and a redesigned website for the City of Los Angeles in a Google+ hangout with reporters Wednesday.

“Silicon Beach has raised the game,” Villaraigosa said, referring to the city’s coastal tech hub. “And the city of L.A. needed to raise ours. And we did.”

The new look for the website, which launched Wednesday, is the first refresh in 15 years. It delivers clearer portals for business owners and visitors to the city. It also brings better access to city TV channels, where people can watch live streams of city council meetings.

During the hangout, councilman Joe Buscaino said the city would be hiring a website content manager to make sure the website isn’t filled with outdated and useless information.

On the app, city residents can also pay their Department of Water and Power bill. There’s also an option to find nearby parks, libraries and police stations. By taking advantage of a smartphone’s GPS and camera, the app promises to make reporting complaints a simpler process. L.A. is one of the last big cities in the country to have a 311 app.

“My LA 311” comes alongside the first major re-launch of the city’s website in 15 years. The new LACity.org offers a smarter user experience with self-updating “Top 10 Service Requests”, “Top 10 City Council Files,” and a “Dynamic City Calendar.” The citizen-centric redesign features live streaming home screen video, centralized job opportunities, and easy to access City services. The site will also provide a more social user experience through “LA City Now,” a homepage ticker-tape of every City twitter feed. Read more »

Billboard Working Group – volunteers wanted

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Opportunity – Respond quickly if interested.
The Department of City Planning is looking for volunteers for a new billboard working group. The PLUM Committee has directed us to assemble this working group to address billboard and digital billboard issues, and in particular a potential new program that could allow a limited number of digital billboards in exchange for the removal of a greater number of existing traditional billboards, provision of specific community benefits, and/or revenue sharing with the City. The working group will be composed of stakeholders who represent the range of perspectives on these topics, and will meet three times over the next five weeks or so, at City Hall downtown (dates TBD). In order to enable fruitful discussions, the group will be limited to about 20 people. While we might not be able to accommodate everyone who wants to participate, we will make every effort to ensure that the group has a balanced range of viewpoints from throughout the City. Volunteers should contact Daisy Mo at [email protected] by this coming Wednesday, Feb. 6. Thank you!

http://plancheckncla.com/2013/02/billboard-working-group-volunteers-wanted

L.A.’s Neighborhood Councils Flex Their Muscles

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From the L.A. Daily News, January 24, 2013

A recent fight over a proposed $3 billion bond issue for street repairs illustrated the growing influence of neighborhood councils in Los Angeles City government, as they exerted enough influence to keep the measure off the ballot for now.

The success in that case represents an evolution for the councils, which at their inception a dozen years ago were seen as potentially powerless because they held no real voting authority in city matters. But through wider participation and exerting a louder voice, observers say, they are now fulfilling the influential role envisioned for them when voters revised the City Charter in 1999.

“This is what it was meant to be,” said Raphael Sonenshein, executive director of the Pat Brown Institute at California State University, Los Angeles, and who served as the top aide to the appointed Charter Reform Commission.

“They were meant to be a strong community voice and weigh in on major issues. It might be annoying (to the City Council, but the whole idea was to create a different form of review and allow the community to weigh in.”

The street bond proposal from Councilmen Mitch Englander and Joe Buscaino provided the perfect vehicle for neighborhood councils to weigh in.
Englander and Buscaino proposed on a Friday afternoon to have the council vote the following week to place the bond on the May 21 ballot, without any formal staff reports and only sketchy details on the cost for the public.

Neighborhood council groups, starting with the Los Angeles Alliance of Neighborhood Councils, and supported by the Valley Alliance and others, called for a 60-day delay to allow time for review of the proposal. City Council offices began receiving telephone calls of protest from homeowners. The public outcry forced the council to Read more »

Boost For Bikes: City Council Allows Car Parking To Be Swapped For Bike Spaces

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Bike rack (Photo by via the LAist Featured Photos pool)

It took a long time but the Los Angeles City Council has passed an ordinance that will dramatically increase the number of parking spaces for bikes in new developments.

The Bike Parking Ordinance will allow new developments—both residential and commercial—to swap some parking spots for bikes in lieu of parking spots for cars. There are also rules standardizing bike parking space to ensure that they’re safe, secure and accessible.

One car spot can be replaced by four bikes for up to 30 percent of the required number of spaces for commercial developments that are near transit lines. At other commercial buildings not near transit lines, the number is 20 percent. For buildings with less than 20 required car parking spaces, up to 4 parking spaces may be swapped for bike parking. Residential buildings can replace up to 10 percent of car spaces with bike parking.

All new developments with few exceptions will need to have at least 2 parking spaces for bikes, and that can include the city’s bike corrals. The ordinance also has rules about what can and cannot be considered a parking spot. Spaces should be well-lit and easily accessible from the street. Short-term parking should be outside the building and easy to spot before you even walk in. There should be signs directing people to long-term parking, if it’s not immediately obvious where it is.

For more information, you can read the full ordinance (h/t Curbed LA and Streetsblog).

Consolidated Plan Community Follow-Up Meetings

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How Will Federal Funds Transform Your Community?

Last October, you told the City of Los Angeles how Federal funds should be spent to improve your neighborhoods, such as more affordable housing, job training, and street repairs.

The City heard you and has included many of your ideas in a plan that will make these improvements, and more, possible in your community. Please join City representatives at any of the meetings listed to hear about the proposed plan and to tell us what you think.

There are two meetings currently scheduled for the San Fernando Valley:

SOUTH VALLEY AREA
Marvin Braude Constituent Service Center
6262 Van Nuys Boulevard
Van Nuys, CA 91401
Wednesday, January 30, 2013
6:30 – 8:30 PM

NORTH VALLEY AREA
Northeast Valley City Hall
13520 Van Nuys Blvd.,
Pacoima, CA 91331
Thursday, February 7, 2013
6:30 – 8:30 PM

What is the Consolidated Plan?

Every five years, the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) requires the City of Los Angeles to develop a plan that guides how it will spend its annual Federal grants that assist very-low, low-, and moderate-income communities around the city. The Consolidated Plan sets out the funding for programs that help: businesses create jobs, and provide job training for adults and youth; improve neighborhoods by eliminating slum and blight; fund gang and homeless prevention programs; create affordable housing; and, provide services for seniors and the disabled.

Why are community meetings being held?

As part of the city’s planning process, we need your opinions on how the Federal funds should be spent. HUD and the City want to hear from you about what you believe the needs and strengths are in your communities, so that, together, we will develop plans that will best put these grant funds to use in your neighborhoods.

With so much need in the city, how will these funds be targeted?

Under the Consolidated Plan, Federal funds will be targeted to create more livable and healthy communities with more affordable housing and jobs, etc. Your comments will help us determine what’s most important to you and help us to create a plan that guides how we achieve those goals over the next five years.

City of Los Angeles Needs Pollworkers for the 2013 Municipal Elections

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City Clerk June Lagmay announced today that the Office of the City Clerk – Election Division is in need of approximately 3,000 additional pollworkers to staff polls for the 2013 Municipal Elections on March 5, 2013 and May 21, 2013.  The Election Division expects to place a total of 6,240 pollworkers to work these two elections and will place these pollworkers at polling locations in the jurisdiction of the City of Los Angeles, the Los Angeles Unified School District, and/or the Los Angeles Community College District.

Pollworkers play an integral part in meeting voters’ needs by ensuring their neighbors have the opportunity to vote locally in their communities, an essential right and responsibility of American democracy.

Pollworkers earn stipends for each election day they work.  Inspectors receive a $100 stipend and are paid an additional $25 for attending a mandatory training class and another $50 for picking up and dropping off polling place supplies and voting equipment.  Clerks receive an $80 stipend and an additional $25 for attending a mandatory training class.

In order to serve as a pollworker, the applicant must be a U.S. citizen and registered voter who will be at least 18 years old on Election Day, and is able to speak, read, and write in English.

In addition to English-speaking pollworkers, the Election Division seeks bilingual pollworkers who speak English and one of nine non-English languages including Armenian, Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, Tagalog, Thai, and Vietnamese.

Applicants may sign up by calling the Election Division’s Pollworker Recruitment Hotline toll free at (866) 899-VOTE (8683) or locally at (213) 978-0363.  An online pollworker application is also available on the Election Division’s website http://cityclerk.lacity.org/election/ in the “Pollworker Information” section.

The Office of the City Clerk – Election Division administers elections for the City of Los Angeles, the Los Angeles Unified School District, and the Los Angeles Community College District.  The City’s Primary Nominating Election will be held March 5, 2013 and the General Municipal Election will be held May 21, 2013.  More information can be found on the Election Division’s website at: http://cityclerk.lacity.org/election/.

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