Category: Elections

Candidate Workshop 2019 Neighborhood Council Elections (1/19/2019 in Van Nuys)

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Date and Time

Sat, January 19, 2019
10:00 AM – 12:00 PM PST

Location

Marvin Braude Building
6262 Van Nuys Boulevard
Van Nuys, CA 91401

Description

At our Neighborhood Council Candidate Workshop, you’ll learn tips for:

  • running a successful campaign
  • connecting with voters
  • advocating for issues you’re passionate about
  • writing your personal statements

You’ll also be able to register as a candidate during the workshop, either online (if you bring your own tablet or laptop) or on paper.

Please make sure to RSVP, to make sure we have enough space for everyone. Read more »

2016 Neighborhood Council Elections: Official Results

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The results are in for the 2016 Neighborhood Council Elections! 25,571 voters voted for 1,839 candidates in 82 elections and 8 selections this year. The oldest candidate was 93 years old; the youngest just 14.

34 Neighborhood Councils helped pioneer online voting this year – a first for any election in the City of Los Angeles. 34% of those who voted in this year’s Neighborhood Council Elections cast their ballots online, and half of those voters took advantage of the flexibility online voting offers, casting ballots either from their personal devices (34%) or at one of our 72 Pop-Up Polls (16%). The agility of online voting may be one reason why location and accessibility was one of the highest-rated aspects of the 2016 Elections, according to the 2,065 people who took our post-election survey.

The voting models this Election season were as varied as the 96 Neighborhood Councils themselves. There were 327 unique ballot types, and while many Councils used a single ballot, others used as many as 21 different ballots.

A BIG thank you to the Neighborhood Council leaders who worked with Independent Election Administrators, Election Managers, Election Assistants, Poll Managers, and Poll Workers to empower great candidates, engage passionate voters, and enlist enthusiastic volunteers. The Elections were successful because of the many people who pulled together to make the 2016 elections journey the best ever!

As your new Boards are convened and your Neighborhood Councils determine their vision for the coming years, please keep in mind the three key issues that surveyed voters felt affected their neighborhoods the most: Public Safety (16%); Planning and Development (15%) and Zoning and Land Use (12%). How can your Board best address the way these three issues impact your communities?

Finally, we hope you’ll attend one of the town halls being held over the summer at locations throughout the City. Your feedback on the 2016 Elections is welcomed as well as any other comments you’d like to share that would help EmpowerLA better support our Board Members. Click here to see the full list of town hall meeting dates; times; and locations. Hope to see you there!

Want to see all the numbers from the 2016 Elections? Check out the Election Report page.

Thank You, Election Volunteers!

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We were very lucky to have a great group of volunteers.

We want to thank:

  • Betty Moreno
  • Maria Moreno
  • Monica Topete
  • Andres Topete
  • Robert Gomez
  • Barbara Addis
  • Alex Silver
  • Vita and Paul Jay
  • Denise Woleben

Our four LDS Missionaries

  • Sister Morris
  • Sister Garretson
  • Elder Long
  • Elder Sponseller

And all of our Board Members who greeted people in the office.

2016 Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council Election – Saturday, April 9

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Election Day: Saturday, April 9, 2016
10:00 am to 2:00 pm

Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council Office
11139 Woodley Ave,
Granada Hills, CA 91344

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The following candidates have been certified and will be on the ballot for our April 9 Election.
https://cityclerk.lacity.org/nccr/nccand/cand.html?nc=GRANADA%20HILLS%20NORTH%20NC

Full Election information is available here: https://empowerla.org/elections/region2/ghnnc16/

CityWatch Launches Neighborhood Council Election Portal

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CityWatch, the online news portal, has launched a Neighborhood Council page in partnership with the Department of Neighborhood Empowerment a.k.a. EmpowerLA to support the 2016 Neighborhood Council election outreach. CityWatch is published to encourage grassroots civic engagement through information, ideas and perspective. Editor and co-founder, Ken Draper, was involved in the creation of the Neighborhood Council system and served on the Mid City West Neighborhood Council. Ken is also a regular attendee of the Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Coalition.

The new site contains links the EmpowerLA elections site and will feature articles about Neighborhood Councils, their impact on the City and why Angelenos should run and vote in Neighborhood Council elections this year. With hundreds of thousands of readers citywide as well as a national audience, CityWatch is looking to raise the visibility and influence of Neighborhood Councils in Los Angeles.

Your 2016 Granada Hills North Neighborhood Newsletter is Now Available

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This year, we filled 8 pages to create the most informative newsletter we’ve ever created.

Some of the topics addressed include:

  • Robocalls
  • Emergency Preparedness
  • Neighborhood Council Elections
  • A New Project at the Sunshine Canyon Landfill
  • Illegal Sign Posting
  • Neighborhood Watch News
  • and Aliso Canyon Gas Spill Updates

Click here to download the 2016 Newsletter, or just read it below.

Read more »

Neighborhood Council Elections Are Around the Corner … Here’s Why YOU Should Run

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Originally posted at http://citywatchla.com/8box-left/9995-neighborhood-council-elections-are-around-the-corner-here-s-why-you-should-run. Written by Tim Deegan.

Why do neighborhood councils matter and why should you run for a board seat on your NC? At their best, and some excel at this, they serve as local political organizations that are empowered to monitor the critical issues in their communities such as land use and development, transportation and parking, and public safety. These are three key issues facing every neighborhood and depending on the NC, there are other issues to tackle as well.

The Mayor, Department heads, and City Councilmembers all listen to NCs for what’s happening in their communities. Through written advisories and “community impact statements” the NCs let city government heads know from the neighborhood level why a specific proposal may be a good or a bad idea. When the City Charter established the Neighborhood Council system over a decade ago, it gave them advisory roles that the smart occupants at City Hall have learned to pay attention to.

As stated in Article IX of the Los Angeles City Charter, the “Purpose of Neighborhood Councils” is “To promote more citizen participation in government and make government more responsive to local needs”.

So what’s in it for you? Service to your community. What could be better than that? This service includes, but is not limited to, keeping your neighborhood whole, challenging development that does not fit the character of your neighborhood, and working closely with the police and fire departments on public safety issues.

As an NC board member, you will have the opportunity to Read more »

Englander Set to Run Unopposed in Council District 12

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Mitch Englander

Mitch Englander

The filing period for the 2015 Los Angeles city election ended Wednesday.

Incumbents Paul Krekorian, Herb Wesson, and Mitch Englander are the only candidates to have qualified for the ballot in their council districts.

Two possible candidates had initially filed to run against Englander, who represents the northwest San Fernando Valley.

Candidates had to file petitions with at least 500 valid signatures from voters in their districts and pay a $300 filing fee by 5 p.m. to qualify for the March 3 ballot, according to City Clerk Holly Wolcott. The filing fee is waived for candidates filing petitions with at least 1,000 signatures.

The offices being contested are the City Council seats for Districts 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 14; the District 1, 3, 5 and 7 seats on the Los Angeles Unified School District Board of Education and seats 1, 3, 5 and 7 on the Los Angeles Community College District Board of Trustees.

The list of candidates will not be complete until the Office of the City Clerk concludes verifying signatures.

The Sixth District, which includes Van Nuys and surrounding neighborhoods, could have a rematch of last year’s special election. Councilwoman Nury Martinez has qualified for the ballot, while former Assemblywoman Cindy Montanez filed her petition Wednesday. Martinez defeated Montanez, 55 percent to 45 percent, in the special election to replace Rep. Tony Cardenas.

The Fourth District City Council seat being vacated by Councilman Tom LaBonge, who is barred from running for re-election because of term limits, has the most candidates to have qualified for the ballot, seven, including Carolyn Ramsay, a former chief of staff for LaBonge; Joan Pelico, the chief of staff for Councilman Paul Koretz; former Assemblyman Wally Knox; and Los Angeles Community College Board of Trustees member Steve Veres.

Five candidates have filed petitions to run for the Eighth District seat held by Councilman Bernard Parks, who is barred from seeking re-election because of term limits. Robert L. Cole Jr., a member of the Los Angeles County Citizens’ Economy & Efficiency Commission, and Marqueece Harris-Dawson, a community coalition director, have qualified for the ballot, according to the Office of the City Clerk.

Councilman Jose Huizar and former Supervisor Gloria Molina have both qualified for the ballot in the 14th District. Six other candidates have filed to run.

City News Service and Post-Periodical

Assemblyman Raul Bocanegra Concedes AD39 Race to Patty Lopez

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From http://www.postperiodical.com/assemblyman-raul-bocanegra-concedes-race-patty-lopez/

Patty Lopez, a mostly unknown candidate from San Fernando, has defeated incumbent Assemblymember Raul Bocanegra (D-Pacoima), according to the official election results released Monday.

Patty Lopez

Lopez led by 182 votes on election night and won by 467 votes with provisional and mail-in ballots counted. Bocanegra said he will not ask for a recount.

“While the vote tally is incredibly close, it is clear that my opponent will be victorious by the narrowest of margins,” he said. “Although many residents and community leaders throughout the 39th Assembly District have urged me to undertake a recount, I do not want to put the state — and particularly the residents of the northeast San Fernando Valley — through such a costly and time-consuming process.”

The result shocked the political establishment from Los Angeles to Sacramento. Bocanegra, a first-term candidate, was considered a strong candidate for Assembly speaker. He won his primary by nearly 40 points and collected more than $600,000 in campaign contributions this year.

Meanwhile, Lopez said she never Read more »

Interested in Making a Difference in Your Community? The Candidate Filing Period Is Open!

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If you wish to promote your community, the opportunities are endless.

The Candidate Filing Period began December 16, 2013 and ends January 15, 2014.

The easiest way to file as a candidate is online.  Here’s how:

  1. Go to http://empowerla.org/ghnnc/granada-hills-north-nc-2014-elections/
  2. Click on File Online tab in the right-hand column
  3. Fill out the online form and click Submit.

We look forward to seeing as many of our Granada Hills North stakeholders running for a position on our board as possible.

Remember, Election Day is Saturday, March 1, 2014.

We are better when we are connected.
Happy Holidays!

Stakeholder Definition Changes

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On Wednesday, December 18, 2013, LA’s City Council voted unanimously to approve CF 12-1682, changing the name and definition of the Factual Basis Stakeholder to Community Interest Stakeholder, defined as those who have a “substantial and ongoing participation within the Neighborhood Council’s boundaries.”

The ordinance now goes to the Mayor for his signature and then must be posted before it becomes effective, anticipated to be around the end of January, 2014, which is in advance of any of the upcoming Neighborhood Council elections scheduled to take place in March, April, and May of 2014.

In preparation for the transition from the current Factual Basis stakeholder definition to the impending Community Interest stakeholder definition:

The EmpowerLA website has been revised so that this statement appears at the top of each Neighborhood Councils 2014 Elections page with asterisks on the Board Seat, the Candidate Qualifications, the Voter Qualifications, the Elections Manual, and the Acceptable Forms of Documentation:

*Pending legislation may result in a revision of the definition of the Factual Basis stakeholder, which may impact the qualifications to run and to vote for Factual Basis seat(s).

The City Clerk and the Independent Election Administrators will advise all Candidates filing as Factual Basis Candidates that the open seat’s name and qualifications are subject to change when the Ordinance becomes effective, at which time they would have three business days to offer additional documentation, if necessary, in order to qualify for the newly defined seat.

The City Clerk, when certifying Candidates, will offer two forms of certification; one for Candidates that are certified and one for Factual Basis Candidates who are “Certified pending anticipated Ordinance which may require additional documentation.”

Vote-by-Mail voters that file as Factual Basis Voters will be notified that the pending change in the definition of the Factual Basis Voter may impact their qualifications as a VBM voter.

The LA Times writes, “The Los Angeles City Council agreed Wednesday to tighten the rules for who can vote in neighborhood council elections after complaints that an overly broad definition of community stakeholder had allowed outsiders to manipulate results.

The new rules mark an ongoing attempt to refine the neighborhood governance system, struck in the late 1990s after the San Fernando Valley secession movement to give residents a stronger voice in city politics.

Previously, anyone could vote in a neighborhood council race just by displaying a receipt for a latte from around the corner, as proof of having a vested interest in a community — a “Starbucks stakeholder.”

Now voters must either work, live, own property or show membership in a community organization within council boundaries. The new language changes the voter definition from someone who “owns property” to someone who “owns real property.”

The City Attorney writes, “On October 1, 2013, City Council requested that our Office amend the definition of a “Stakeholder” in the Neighborhood Council system. City Council asked that we
change the definition to reflect that membership will be open to anyone who lives, works or owns property in the neighborhood and also to anyone who declares a stake in the neighborhood as a Community Interest Stakeholder. “Community Interest Stakeholder” is defined as a person who affirms a substantial and ongoing participation within the Neighborhood Council’s boundaries and who participates in community organizations with areas of focus that include, but not limited to, educational, non-profit or religious. In addition, City Council requested that the term “own property” be defined to mean “own real property.” The requested change is reflected in LAAC Section 22.811 (a)(2), which states:

“that neighborhood council membership will be open to everyone who lives, works or owns real property in the neighborhood and also to those who declare a stake in the neighborhood as a community interest stakeholder, defined as a person who affirms a substantial and ongoing participation within the neighborhood council’s boundaries and who may be in a community organization such as, but not limited to, educational, non-profit and/or religious organizations;”

In addition to changing the stakeholder definition, City Council also asked for certain changes to the Neighborhood Council board structure. Specifically, City Council asked that any at-large positions on the Neighborhood Council Board be open to all stakeholders and not simply community interest stakeholders. Thus, City Council asked to remove the requirement that Neighborhood Councils provide governing board positions reserved for Community Interest Stakeholders provided that there is an at large position for which all stakeholders may vote and run. In addition, City Council requested that Neighborhood Councils be allowed to “determine the number of governing board seats that will be allocated to the Community Interest Stakeholder.” City Council also requested that the affirmation of those Community Interest Stakeholders proposed in the Neighborhood Councils by-laws be consistent with and equal to the affirmation required of stakeholders who live work or own property. The requested revision is reflected in LAAC Section 22.810.1 (b)(2)(C)(iii)(1), which states:

“The governing body must, to the extent possible, reflect the diversity of the neighborhood council’s stakeholders. All stakeholders must be eligible to vote and run for at least one board seat. Neighborhood councils may allocate their board seats to specific stakeholder categories and establish stakeholder eligibility requirements in voting for the board seats. If a neighborhood council allocates its board seats to specific stakeholder categories, then the neighborhood council must include at least one seat for which every stakeholder is eligible to vote and run. Neighborhood councils may not allocate a majority of their board seats to a single stakeholder group, unless approved by the Department upon a showing of extenuating circumstances. The election procedures created by the Department or City Clerk pursuant to Section 20.36 shall require, in a situation where neighborhood council requires that a stakeholders to provide proof of eligibility, that proof of stakeholder status for community interest stakeholders must be consistent with and substantially equivalent to the evidentiary proof required of stakeholders who live, work or own property.”

For more information on Stakeholder definitions, how to run as a Candidate, serve as a Volunteer, or participate as a Voter in the upcoming Neighborhood Council elections, visit EmpowerLA.org or email [email protected] or call 818-293-8683 (vote).

To file as a candidate, contact LA’s City Clerk by emailing [email protected] or calling 818-293-VOTE (8683) or visiting their office at 200 N. Spring Street, Room 360 Los Angeles, CA 90012.

Eric Garcetti Wins Mayor Race, Pot Shop Limit Passes

LA Mayoral Candidates Go To The Polls On Election Day

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Eric Garcetti triumphs in the LA mayoral race (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty)

It’s official: Eric Garcetti has won the race for Los Angeles mayor over Wendy Greuel, who conceded this morning.

With 100 percent of precincts reporting, Garcetti earned 54 percent of the votes and Greuel had 46 percent, ABC News reports.

Garcetti is both LA’s first Jewish mayor and, at 42, its youngest mayor in 100 years, according to the LA Times.

He tweeted his thanks to the voters: “Thank you Los Angeles–the hard work begins but I am honored to lead this city for the next four years. Let’s make this a great city again.”

Eric Garcetti Mayoral Tweet
Last night, things looked too close to call, with both candidates appearing optimistic about their chances. Read more »

Today Is the Last Day to Register to Vote in the May 21 Mayoral Election

Voter Registration Deadline

Eligible residents must register to vote by Monday, May 6, 2013 in order to be able to vote in the May 21, 2013 City of Los Angeles General Municipal and Special Elections.

To be eligible to vote, you must be a citizen of the United States and 18 years old by Election Day. Registered voters who have moved or changed their names since the last election must re-register to vote. Voter registration is handled by the Office of the California Secretary of State. You can register to vote from the following sources:

  • Contact the Office of the California Secretary of State. Complete your registration online at https://rtv.sos.ca.gov/elections/register-to-vote/, or download the form at http://www.eac.gov/assets/1/Documents/Federal%20Voter%20Registration_1209_en9242012.pdf and complete and return by mail.
  • Contact the Office of the Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk’s (RR/CC) by visiting their website at www.lavote.net or email them at [email protected]. You can also call them at toll-free at (800) 481-VOTE or direct at (562) 466-1310, or register in person at the RR/CC Office at 12400 Imperial Highway, Norwalk, CA 90650
  • Voter registration forms may also be available at the public counter of most Los Angeles City and County buildings, libraries, fire stations, post offices, and Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) offices

The Official Sample Ballot for the May 21, 2013 City of Los Angeles General Municipal and Special Elections (available in English and the eight Federally-mandated languages of Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, Tagalog, Thai, and Vietnamese) is available on the Election Division’s website at http://clerk.lacity.org/Elections/ under the “Polling Place and Official Sample Ballot Look Up” link. Copies of the Official Sample Ballot and Voter Information Pamphlet are also available by contacting the Office of the City Clerk – Election Division by May 17, 2013.

Mayoral Candidates Eric Garcetti and Wendy Greuel to Answer Your Questions in Porter Ranch

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The Mayoral Candidates – Eric Garcetti and Wendy Greuel – are coming to Porter Ranch to answer your questions. The Porter Ranch Neighborhood Council has scheduled them on two different days, which should create a more relaxed atmosphere for you to ask questions and hear candid responses from the candidates.

L.A. City Council Member Eric Garcetti

Tuesday, May 7
6 pm to 7 pm
Room 202

L.A. City Controller Wendy Greuel

Wednesday, May 8
7 pm to 8 pm
Room 130

Shepherd of the Hills Church
19700 Rinaldi St
Porter Ranch, CA 91326

Mayor to Eliminate Neighborhood Council Election Funding

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This week neighborhood councils were blindsided by the Mayor’s office.  The Mayor said that because the Proposition A sales tax measure failed to pass, he will not include funding for 2014 neighborhood council elections in his proposed budget.  If neighborhood councils want elections, they will need to collectively surrender 20 percent of their proposed $37,000 allocations to pay for it.

City Attorney Carmen Trutanich sent the Mayor a message yesterday, March 14, (with copies to Herb Wesson, Paul Krekorian and Miguel Santana, the City’s financial chief ) saying that cutting neighborhood council funding to a level where they could not perform their function could violate the City Charter.

Trutanich urged the Mayor to “provide full funding to all neighborhood councils” so they can do what the Charter asks them to do.

Here’s the letter in full.

The City Attorney’s letter is the result of requests for support and action from the Neighborhood Council Budget Advocates, chaired by Jay Handal.

City of Los Angeles Needs Pollworkers for the 2013 Municipal Elections

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City Clerk June Lagmay announced today that the Office of the City Clerk – Election Division is in need of approximately 3,000 additional pollworkers to staff polls for the 2013 Municipal Elections on March 5, 2013 and May 21, 2013.  The Election Division expects to place a total of 6,240 pollworkers to work these two elections and will place these pollworkers at polling locations in the jurisdiction of the City of Los Angeles, the Los Angeles Unified School District, and/or the Los Angeles Community College District.

Pollworkers play an integral part in meeting voters’ needs by ensuring their neighbors have the opportunity to vote locally in their communities, an essential right and responsibility of American democracy.

Pollworkers earn stipends for each election day they work.  Inspectors receive a $100 stipend and are paid an additional $25 for attending a mandatory training class and another $50 for picking up and dropping off polling place supplies and voting equipment.  Clerks receive an $80 stipend and an additional $25 for attending a mandatory training class.

In order to serve as a pollworker, the applicant must be a U.S. citizen and registered voter who will be at least 18 years old on Election Day, and is able to speak, read, and write in English.

In addition to English-speaking pollworkers, the Election Division seeks bilingual pollworkers who speak English and one of nine non-English languages including Armenian, Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, Tagalog, Thai, and Vietnamese.

Applicants may sign up by calling the Election Division’s Pollworker Recruitment Hotline toll free at (866) 899-VOTE (8683) or locally at (213) 978-0363.  An online pollworker application is also available on the Election Division’s website http://cityclerk.lacity.org/election/ in the “Pollworker Information” section.

The Office of the City Clerk – Election Division administers elections for the City of Los Angeles, the Los Angeles Unified School District, and the Los Angeles Community College District.  The City’s Primary Nominating Election will be held March 5, 2013 and the General Municipal Election will be held May 21, 2013.  More information can be found on the Election Division’s website at: http://cityclerk.lacity.org/election/.

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