Category: GHNNC

GHNNC 2013 Summer Social FIESTA – Saturday, July 13

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¡Hola!  ¡Es tiempo para fiesta!

Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council is having our 3rd Annual Summer Social and you, our Stakeholders, are invited for an evening of food and fun—fiesta style. We’ll have authentic Mexican food by Custom Caterers, live music and dancers by Azteca Mexico, piñatas, sombrero games, Magic Castle magician Mark Paskell, trivia games, cactus ring toss game, and a special Macho Nacho eating contest.

GHNNC board member and Educational Representative Steven Steinberg will be teaching the Mexican Hat Dance, Salsa, and other fun dances. Come for the excitement, have a nice meal, meet your neighbors, talk with your elected board members, and have a wonderful evening.

Come join us Saturday, July 13, 2013, from 6pm to 10pm at the

St. Euphrasia School Hall
11766 Shoshone Ave
Granada Hills, CA 91344

See you there!

The Fastest Route to City Hall

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In a city the size of Los Angeles, one of the fastest routes to City Hall is the internet. In the time it takes to find your car keys, you can be online and communicating with the Mayor and the City Council.

Effective Neighborhood Council advocates typically know three things; they know the issue, they know what they want, and they know who can help them.

Then they do something about it. Here are a few tips for effective email advocacy, followed by the email addresses of the Mayor and the City Council, complemented by a simple link that allows you to email the Mayor and the City Council with one click.

Identify yourself and your Neighborhood Council. Let them know that you are a voting resident or a taxpaying business owner or an active parent volunteer.

Be polite and professional. You can disagree, you can be firm and forceful, but always remember that you are creating a public document and your objective is to persuade.

Be clear and state your objective. You can complain all day long but if you don’t get to the point and ask for help, compliance, or support,  you won’t get what you want.

Look for common ground. We live in a great city and we’re all partners in making it even better. Let people know that you want to help them help you.

Encourage others to join you. There is strength in numbers and if you take to time to write a persuasive email, share it with others so that they can support you.

Be grateful. Take the time to write, even when you aren’t asking for something or opposed to something. Become the memorable constituent by noticing the good and by thanking your leadership when they get it right.

Contact the Mayor and City Council:

Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa – [email protected]

Click HERE to determine your Council District and contact your councilman below.

Ed Reyes, CD 1 – [email protected]

Paul Krekorian, CD2 – [email protected]

Dennis P. Zine, CD 3 – [email protected]

Tom LaBonge, CD 4 – [email protected]

Paul Koretz, CD 5 – [email protected]

vacant, CD 6 – [email protected]

Richard Alarcon, CD 7 – [email protected]

Bernard Parks, CD 8 – [email protected]

Jan Perry, CD 9 – [email protected]

Herb J. Wesson, Jr. CD 10 – [email protected]

Bill Rosendahl, CD 11 – [email protected]

Mitch Englander, CD 12 – [email protected]

Eric Garcetti, CD 13 – [email protected]

Jose Huizar, CD 14 – [email protected]

Joe Buscaino, CD 15 – [email protected]

To contact the Mayor and ALL Councilmembers, email [email protected]rLA.org which will forward your email to ALL emails above.

Mayor to Eliminate Neighborhood Council Election Funding

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This week neighborhood councils were blindsided by the Mayor’s office.  The Mayor said that because the Proposition A sales tax measure failed to pass, he will not include funding for 2014 neighborhood council elections in his proposed budget.  If neighborhood councils want elections, they will need to collectively surrender 20 percent of their proposed $37,000 allocations to pay for it.

City Attorney Carmen Trutanich sent the Mayor a message yesterday, March 14, (with copies to Herb Wesson, Paul Krekorian and Miguel Santana, the City’s financial chief ) saying that cutting neighborhood council funding to a level where they could not perform their function could violate the City Charter.

Trutanich urged the Mayor to “provide full funding to all neighborhood councils” so they can do what the Charter asks them to do.

Here’s the letter in full.

The City Attorney’s letter is the result of requests for support and action from the Neighborhood Council Budget Advocates, chaired by Jay Handal.

L.A.’s Neighborhood Councils Flex Their Muscles

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From the L.A. Daily News, January 24, 2013

A recent fight over a proposed $3 billion bond issue for street repairs illustrated the growing influence of neighborhood councils in Los Angeles City government, as they exerted enough influence to keep the measure off the ballot for now.

The success in that case represents an evolution for the councils, which at their inception a dozen years ago were seen as potentially powerless because they held no real voting authority in city matters. But through wider participation and exerting a louder voice, observers say, they are now fulfilling the influential role envisioned for them when voters revised the City Charter in 1999.

“This is what it was meant to be,” said Raphael Sonenshein, executive director of the Pat Brown Institute at California State University, Los Angeles, and who served as the top aide to the appointed Charter Reform Commission.

“They were meant to be a strong community voice and weigh in on major issues. It might be annoying (to the City Council, but the whole idea was to create a different form of review and allow the community to weigh in.”

The street bond proposal from Councilmen Mitch Englander and Joe Buscaino provided the perfect vehicle for neighborhood councils to weigh in.
Englander and Buscaino proposed on a Friday afternoon to have the council vote the following week to place the bond on the May 21 ballot, without any formal staff reports and only sketchy details on the cost for the public.

Neighborhood council groups, starting with the Los Angeles Alliance of Neighborhood Councils, and supported by the Valley Alliance and others, called for a 60-day delay to allow time for review of the proposal. City Council offices began receiving telephone calls of protest from homeowners. The public outcry forced the council to Read more »

OK/HELP Post-Earthquake Window Sign Program Launched

OK/HELP Post-Earthquake Window Sign Program Launched

On Monday, Oct. 15, Councilmember Mitch Englander and his Council District 12 staff held a press conference to introduce the new OK/HELP post-earthquake window signs, and gave a live demonstration of how this valuable community preparedness tool will be used.

OK/HELP is a window sign with clear, simple instructions provided by the Los Angeles Fire Department, American Red Cross, and the U.S. Geological Survey on what to do immediately after a major earthquake.

After a major earthquake, the user tears off the sign and posts it in their front window indicating to emergency personnel, Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT) or neighbors if they are “OK” or need “HELP.”

To see a graphic of the OK HELP sign online at http://db.tt/wJra70QV
To see more photos of the demonstration, visit http://tiny.cc/OKHELPphotos.

After the press conference, a live demonstration was staged showing how to use the OK/HELP sign. Several houses posted the sign up in their windows. The CERT volunteer team swept the street, checking the status of all of the houses. When they located the house that needed “HELP,” they radioed the location to the Firefighters, who responded
with a Fire Engine and simulated giving aid to the injured resident.

50,000 OK/HELP window signs will be distributed for free to LA residents, first in the San Fernando Valley and eventually city wide. As part of a broader outreach effort to increase community engagement in emergency preparedness, they will available at LAFD Fire Stations, Recreation Centers, libraries, and will be handed out at Neighborhood Council meetings, Neighborhood Watch meetings, and will be mailed out.

Granada Hills-Knollwood Community Plan Update Moves Forward

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The draft of the new Granada Hills-Knollwood Community Plan and Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) are now available for community members to review.

The Community Plan is the long range land use plan for the area that will shape the future of the community, guide future growth, protect neighborhood character, and enhance the quality of life for those who live, work and invest in the area. Having a strong and updated Community Plan will ensure that we can preserve the character and quality of life in Granada Hills that we place such a high value on.

To see the proposed plan, map showing all of the recommendations, the DEIR and related materials, visit https://sites.google.com/site/granadahillsncp. A printed copy of the DEIR is also available for review at the Granada Hills Branch Library, located at 10640 Petit Ave., Granada Hills.

We encourage you to give your input on the new Plan and the DEIR by email, mail or fax to: Anna M. Vidal, Granada Hills-Knollwood Planner. Los Angeles Department of City Planning, 6262 Van Nuys Blvd., Room 430, Van Nuys, CA 91401. [email protected]. Phone: (818) 374-5043. Fax: (818) 374-9955.

Include “Granada Hills-Knollwood Community Plan” in the subject line. All comments on the DEIR must be received by Monday, Nov. 26. There will also be other opportunities to comment on the plan and proposed land use recommendations before they are adopted by City Council.

Please check the project website for the upcoming open house and public hearing coming this winter. Once this event is scheduled, the date and time will be posted on the website, and people who have subscribed to the notification list will receive a notice as well.

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