Category: Granada Hills North

North San Fernando Valley Transit Corridor Public Meetings

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Metro is holding a series of meetings regarding the proposed North San Fernando Valley Bus Rapid Transit Corridor project. These informational meetings give the public the opportunity to learn more about the project, provide input on proposed project alternatives as well as meet the project team and have questions answered. The BRT project is scheduled for consideration at the Thursday, September 26 Metro Board of Directors regular meeting to accept the Alternative Analysis Report, which you can view on the project website, and advance the project to environmental review.  Three separate meetings will be held at the following times and locations:

Thursday, August 8
5:30 PM – 7:30 PM
Laurel Hall School, Cafeteria
11919 Oxnard St.
North Hollywood
(Limited parking is available)

Saturday, August 10
11 AM – 1 PM
(Spanish Meeting with English Translation)
Plaza Del Valle Community Room
8160 Van Nuys Blvd
Panorama City
(Limited parking is available)

Monday, August 12
6 PM – 8 PM
CSUN Orange Grove Bistro
18111 Nordhoff St.
Northridge
(Validated parking is available)

To get the latest updates about this project, sign-up for the email by contacting [email protected]netCheck out the website for additional updates.

Sign Up Today for the Valley Disaster Preparedness Fair 2019

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A Fun and Free Family Event that Just Might Save Your Life, Your Pet’s Life, or the Life of a Loved One

Saturday, October 12, 2019

9:00 am to 1:30 pm

Northridge Fashion Center—Pacific Theaters Parking Lot
(9400 Shirley Ave., south of Plummer St.)

Click here to register: https://www.valleydisasterfair.com/registration/index.php

  • Exhibits
  • Demonstrations
  • Displays
  • Speakers
  • Special Events
  • Bloodmobile
  • Pet Preparedness
  • Free Parking
  • Free Admission
  • Free Lunch*

It’s All Free!

Complimentary Family Emergency Preparedness (EP) Starter Kit* for registered families attending the Fair. One kit per registered family. (While supplies last.)

Click Read More below for the Spanish flyer
Read more »

Valley’s Record Heat Wave To Continue

Valley Heat Wave

A ridge of high pressure will continue to keep temperatures above normal Monday, but relief is in sight.

A weekend heat wave is expected to continue to scorch the Los Angeles region with above average temperatures Monday.

Sunday saw record heat in parts of the city and triple digit temperatures in the valleys. A ridge of high pressure is to blame, and it will remain in the Los Angeles area Monday. Expect above-normal temperatures to most areas, especially the valleys. However, the hot weather won’t challenge records as they did Sunday, forecasters said.

It was a strange kind of heatwave. An offshore flow blowing warm air from the deserts to the ocean helped the high pressure “squash” the marine layer that normally keeps temperatures down in June, Kittell said. But a shallow marine layer remained along the coastal plane and inland, so while Burbank temperatures hit 100 degrees the high in downtown Los Angeles was 82, he said.

The Sunday temperature in Burbank surprisingly hit 100 degrees, which tied a 1979 record for June 9 and a 101 in Woodland Hills and 102 in Van Nuys failed to break records, National Weather Service Meteorologist Ryan Kittell said.

Expect more of the same on Monday with valley temperatures in the mid-90s to 100 but highs downtown and other inland areas in low to mid 80s and mid-70s along beaches, Kittell said.

He did not expect records to be broken Monday because they are higher for this date.

A gradual cooling is expected to begin Tuesday, with valley temperatures in the low to mid-90s, inland temperatures remaining in the low to mid-80s and beach temperatures in the 70s, he said.

The marine layer will thicken and temperatures are forecast to decline Thursday and Friday with valleys in the 80s, inland areas in the 70s and beaches in the upper 60s to 70s, Kittell said.

“This is June Gloom season,” he said.

Who Won?! Find Your Neighborhood Council Election Results

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Find out who won your Neighborhood Council election by visiting the City Clerk’s results page at https://clerk.lacity.org/elections/neighborhood-council-elections/2019-nc-election-results. Click the green button at the top of the list that includes Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council to see results. Or just click here for the unofficial results: https://clerk.lacity.org/sites/g/files/wph606/f/Region%202_Unofficial_Results.pdf

When are election results available?

Ballots are counted by the City Clerk one business day after Election Day. Unofficial results are posted up to 3 days after Election Day; official results up to 10 days after Election Day.

Want to watch the ballot counting or have questions? Call City Clerk Elections team at (213) 978-0444 or write to them at [email protected]

Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council Election is This Saturday, May 4

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Dear Neighbors and Stakeholders of Granada Hills North:

You may have heard of our upcoming Neighborhood Council Elections for Granada Hills Neighborhood Council.  The Neighborhood Council is your liaison with City Hall. We are your voice for issues that affect our community. This is an opportunity for you to engage in the process of electing the members of our wonderful Neighborhood Council.

The elections will be held on Saturday, May 4, 2019 at Knollwood Plaza, 11850 Balboa Blvd, Granada Hills, CA (Between Lorillard and Midwood). The polls open at 10:00am and close at 4:00pm. Read more »

Plan to Steer Air Traffic over the Valley Hits Turbulence

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Residents in western San Fernando Valley are trying to halt FAA plans to direct more air traffic over the neighborhood.

More than 1,900 residents have signed a petition against an FAA plan to allow more passenger flights from Hollywood Burbank Airport over several San Fernando Valley communities, it was reported Friday.

The group, called Studio City for Quiet Skies, launched the petition in response to Federal Aviation Administration plans to move departing flights on a trajectory farther south over Studio City, Sherman Oaks and Encino, the Los Angeles Daily News reported. The petition was on the online site Change.org.

Residents say the changes would bring more noise, traffic and pollution to the area, and they slammed the plan in a series of comments on the petition, according to the Daily News.

“We object to flight paths that expose residents and visitors, our school children, student athletes and people seeking recreation in the foothills of the Santa Monica Mountains Recreation Area, to constant jet noise and pollution,” according to the petition.

“I don’t understand why commercial air traffic is not being directed over the San Fernando Valley’s commercial and industrial zones, or above our numerous freeways,” a Studio City resident wrote. “Our residential neighborhoods are under constant assault with traffic from major thoroughfares being redirected to side streets where people live and children play by Google Maps and Waze. Now the FAA wants to direct planes over our homes and playgrounds as well. Why?”

Airport officials are also concerned about the change, and the Sherman Oaks Homeowners Association and the Studio City Residents Association have both opposed it, the Daily News reported.

Patrick Lammerding, deputy executive director of planning and development at the airport, wrote a letter to FAA officials on Aug. 21, noting his office “cannot express support for the proposed” plan, according to the newspaper.

“It is equally important to us that we act as a good neighbor to the surrounding communities that we serve and who support us,” he wrote.

A spokesman for the FAA said in a statement that the federal agency “is proposing to update two existing routes for aircraft that depart off Runway 15 at Hollywood Burbank Airport. The purpose of the updates is to keep Burbank Runway 15 departures better separated from LAX arrivals to the south and from aircraft that are arriving to Burbank’s Runway 8.”

Los Angeles City Councilman Paul Krekorian, whose district includes North Hollywood and Studio City, said in a statement in August that the new paths will “focus more noise over a smaller area, including over schools and quiet residential neighborhoods.” He added that “the FAA’s unwillingness to be transparent about this process and its complete inability to articulate a true public benefit to be derived from the new flight paths wrongly shuts the public out of the discussion,” the Daily News reported.

https://patch.com/california/northridge/plan-steer-air-traffic-over-valley-hits-turbulence

GHNNC Street Repair Blitz 2018

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The Neighborhood Council Initiative (known to us as the Street Blitz), run by the Bureau of Street Services (BSS), will be in Granada Hills North real soon.  Our area will be assigned a two-person crew on a hot asphalt truck for one day to patch street potholes, pop-outs, small eroded or cracked areas, and do minor curb and sidewalk patching.  The crew is not equipped to handle tree roots that have damaged the street, or are they able to do any major repair for uplifted sidewalks.

Up to 15 locations will be inspected, so we’re looking for the worst spots that can be patched.  Depending on the conditions and amount of asphalt required, not all identified locations will get fixed during the blitz.  Remember, you can always report troublesome locations via 3-1-1. We’re asking for your help in preparing that list for submission to BSS. Since this is based on Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council boundaries, the locations MUST be north of the 118 freeway, west of the 405 freeway, and east of Aliso Canyon, up to the County line. Click here for a map of our boundaries.

Please make your submission no later than July 6.

Include the type of repair (pothole, pop-out, depression, minor lifted sidewalk, etc.), the address (preferred) or intersection, and which side of the street (north bound, east side, etc.). The more info you can provide, the less time spent by BSS trying to find the location. Remember, potholes and minor repairs only. Tree root damage is out, as are streets and sidewalks that require more extensive repairs.

Send your request to [email protected].

Keeping Communities Cool in the Pool

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Councilmember Englander’s office has worked with L.A.’s Bureau of Engineering and the Department of Recreation of Parks to ensure that the Granada Hills Pool will be operational and open for use during the hot summer months.

The pool is decades old and has developed leaks which threatened the ability to keep it open for summer. However, by working with various departments, the Councilmember’s office was able to make sure the necessary repairs were done to keep it open. They have also fully-funded and developed plans for a new aquatic center at the location which will replace the old pool in time for the 2020 swim season!

Aquatic centers such are important community gathering spaces during summer months that provide a safe and fun place for youth and families to gather while school is out and the weather is hot. See you at the pool!

Councilmember Englander proposes floating solar panels on reservoirs

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This week, Councilmember Mitchell Englander joined LADWP Chief Operating Officer Marty Adams, LADWP Chief Sustainability Officer Nancy Sutley, Los Angeles County Business Coalition President Mary Leslie, Actor/Environmental Activists Ed Begley Jr. and Matt Walsh, and students from Porter Ranch Community School to introduce legislation calling for LADWP to explore options to install “floating solar” panels on Los Angeles reservoirs.

Floating solar is an emerging and extremely efficient form of renewable clean energy. By covering the surface of reservoirs, floating solar conserves water by reducing evaporation and prevents harmful algae growth by blocking sunlight. Additionally, there is no land costs associated with the installation and there is greater efficiency of output due to the cooling effect of water.

unnamed (32)Los Angeles reservoirs provide hundreds of acres of local surface area that can be used as a platform for capturing solar energy.  The initial pilot calls for approximately 11.6 MegaWatts of solar installation on DWP reservoirs. That is enough energy to power approximately 3,190 homes per year and the offset 15.9 million lbs. of CO2 emissions per year or the equivalent of removing 1,567, cars from the road. LADWP estimates that Los Angeles Reservoirs have an achievable potential of 53 MW which translates to the electrical use of 21,000 homes annually or the equivalent of taking 10,320 cars off the road.

According to the State Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS), retail sellers and publicly owned utilities are required to procure 50 percent of their electricity from renewable energy resources by 2030.

Los Angeles is in a unique position to lead the country in the adoption of clean, renewable energy. With our geography, our climate, and our city-owned and operated utility, we have all the ingredients necessary to push for the wide-use and adoption of solar energy. By co-locating these panels on city-owned reservoirs, we eliminate the land-use cost and impacts of traditional solar panels.

Read the motion, here and watch news coverage below.

http://abc7.com/science/la-councilman-proposes-floating-solar-panels-on-reservoirs/3366827/

Turning Down the Volume on Party Houses

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L.A. City Council to impose new fines in crackdown on ‘party houses’

On Wednesday, February 21st, the City Council unanimously approved an ordinance to rein in out-of-control party houses in Los Angeles. The ordinance creates a series of escalating fines against the homeowners or those who rent from them, who use their homes for massive gatherings that disturb neighbors, block the public right-of-way, and threaten public safety. It includes increasing fines of up to $8,000. The ordinance also requires those who violate the ordinance to post a public notice for 30 days notifying neighbors of their unlawful conduct.

The new law, first proposed by Councilman David Ryu in 2016, expands the definition of “loud and unruly conduct” to include loud noises, obstruction of a street or public right-of-way, public intoxication and more.

The ordinance, which was supported by a variety of neighborhood councils and community organizations, is meant to dissuade property owners from renting out their homes to professional party-throwers and reduce the likelihood of future violations, freeing up law enforcement personnel for other purposes.

“Too often, we have seen people renting out their homes for the express purpose of turning it into a venue for elaborate events,” Councilmember Paul Koretz noted. “These aren’t barbeques or birthday parties, these are massive events with cover fees and throngs of people tossing cigarette butts in fire prone areas. Trying to control them has been a challenge for the City because the laws and jurisdictional authority have not been clear. This ordinance changes that.”

The new ordinance provides the City with a focused set of procedures and punishments to better address the phenomenon.

“With this new ordinance, the party is over for these completely out-of-hand neighborhood headaches,” said Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer. “With escalating fines into the thousands of dollars, this ordinance has the teeth to help us continue our house party prosecutions with greater effectiveness.”

Apologies in advance to party fans Chad Kroeger and JT Parr.

Granada Hills Emergency Plan Event

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GRANADA HILLS NEIGHBORHOOD COUNCILS

THIS MEETING COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE!

ARE YOU PREPARED FOR THE BIG ONE?

(EARTHQUAKES, FIRE, AND OTHER DISASTERS)

February 1, 2018 at 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Our Granada Hills Emergency Plan Event will be held at Granada Hills Charter High School located

10535 Zelzah St. in Rawley Hall.

This meeting will help you to save lives including your own, your families, and your neighbors.   The Granada Hills Emergency Plan is dedicated to keep you and your loved ones as safe as possible.  During the meeting, you can hear local guest speakers and government officials present helpful information about the following:

  • Instruction Slideshow on Earthquakes
  • Emergency Contacts
  • Local Shelter Locations
  • Local School Pick Up Instructions
  • Utility Controls/Fire Instructions
  • Food and Tool Supply Check List
  • Community Emergency Response Team (CERT)
  • First Aid
  • Disaster Psychology
  • Map Your Neighborhood

Your Neighborhood Council Emergency Preparedness Alliance (NCEPA) tells us that during a major catastrophe we will all be on our own for 3 to 14 days or more; our emergency responders (LAPD and LAFD) do not have the resources to take care of all of us.  It is up to us to take care of ourselves and each other!

For more information please call Mike Benedetto (818) 723-8087 or visit www.GHSNC.org

Mailing Address: 11024 Balboa Blvd., Box 767; Granada Hills, CA 91344

Granada Hills Community Forum for the Los Angeles General Plan

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Thursday, January 18, 2018, at 7:00PM

St. Euphrasia School Auditorium
17637 Mayerling St
Granada Hills, CA 91344

Help Shape the Future of Los Angeles

The Neighborhood Councils of Granada Hills want YOUR input on the update to the General Plan for the City of Los Angeles.

We will be soliciting community feedback on:
– Long-Term Growth
– Air Quality
– Conservation
– Housing
– Mobility
– Noise
– Open Space
– Public Services and Recreation
– Safety
– Anything YOU think is important

 

“Love is a Warm Blanket” Donation Drive

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“Love is a Warm Blanket” is an annual blanket drive for the homeless in Los Angeles and beyond during Winter months, whose mission is to warm the hearts of the homeless and spread love with donations of blankets. New and gently used (washed) blankets will be collected at drop off sites until February 2018. You can also order directly through their Amazon wishlist.

Blankets are personally handed out to the general homeless population on the streets, at distribution events in communities including Skid Row, and to homeless shelter residents including emergency Winter shelters.

You can drop off a donation at any of the following locations.

The Valley Economic Alliance
5121 Van Nuys Blvd.
Sherman Oaks, 91403
Drop Off – MondayFriday8am-6pm
Note – Box on 2nd floor lobby.

The San Fernando Valley Rescue Mission
8756 Canby Ave.
Northridge, 91325
Drop Off – MondayFriday9am-5pm
Note: Buzz in through main gate.

Crossfit Lomita
2074 Pacific Coast Hwy
Lomita, 90717
Drop Off – MondayThursday5am-8:30pm
Friday5am-7:30pm
Saturday9am-12pm
Sunday9am-11am

GHNNC Proposal Regarding the Future Permitting Process for Street Vendors in the City of Los Angeles

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https://www.ghnnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/GHNNC-Street-Vending-10-2017.pdf

WHEREAS, on January 06, 2015, Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council recommended that the City of Los Angeles should prohibit all street vending within the City limits;

WHEREAS, on March 01, 2016, Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council reaffirmed its opposition to street vending, and further resolved that if the City of Los Angeles chose to support street vending then Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council would, in principal, support Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Coalition’s conditions on such street vending;

WHEREAS, on February 15, 2017, the Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously to decriminalize the act of vending food and products along the streets of the City of Los Angeles;

WHEREAS, Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council now seeks to provide a more definite statement on the conditions under which the community would support a street vending ordinance for the City of Los Angeles;

WHEREAS, the City of Los Angeles is one of the most diverse and populous cities in the world, and is comprised of neighborhoods with such substantially different characters and needs that those neighborhoods will desire significantly different types and amounts of street vending;

WHEREAS, each of the ninety-seven Neighborhood Councils recognized by the City of Los Angeles is in the best place to determine what types, amounts, and locations of street vending their own community will be willing to support, able to maintain, cause the least detrimental effects associated with street vending, and be to the most benefit to the community;

NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council supports the following conditions and requirements on the permitting of street vending, and urges the Los Angeles City Council to integrate these suggestions into any ordinance in the City of Los Angeles that establishes a legal framework for permitted street vending:

  1. Prior to the City issuing a permit, any applicant seeking a permit should be required to submit to a review and obtain an opinion from the Neighborhood Council(s) wherein they seek to engage in vending activities;
  2. There should be a process for the local Neighborhood Council(s) to be able to recommend to the permitting agency: (a) conditions on the hours of operation, (b) conditions on the location(s) in which the applicant may conduct business within the neighborhood, and (c) conditions on the types of products they may vend;
  3. Prior to a permit-holder being issued a renewal for an existing permit, the permit-holder should be required to return to the local Neighborhood Council(s) and obtain another opinion under the same conditions as for new applications;
  4. There should be different lengths of time that a permit can be valid prior to requiring a renewal depending on whether food it being sold at the location: (a) permits for the sale of non-food (products-only) should be able to be approved for a period of either one-year, two-years, or three-years; and (b) permits for the sale of food and non-food products, or only food, should be renewed every year;
  5. There should be different categories of permit for street vendors that will primarily sell their food and/or products: (a) at a stationary location, or (b) in a manner that is non-stationary (i.e. using handcarts, at multiple temporary locations, using trucks, et cetera);
  6. An applicant seeking a permit for a stationary location should be required to submit a plan that describes: (a) the proposed location of their merchandise, (b) their plan for any deliveries or drop-offs, (c) the proposed locations of any signs, and (d) how their proposed location will permit the free flow of (i) foot traffic, and (ii) automobile traffic;
  7. Any permits issued for a non-stationary street vendor should specifically delineate the boundaries within which they are permitted to vend;
  8. No permit for a stationary street vending location should be issued within 100 feet of a single-family residence or a school;
  9. Non-stationary street vendors should be barred from selling anything (food or products) within 100 feet of a school;
  10. After obtaining an opinion by the local Neighborhood Council(s), and prior to the issuance of any permit, the agency in charge of the permitting process should review the application for compliance with all relevant laws and deny the applicant if the applicant is not in full compliance;
  11. The agency in charge of the permitting process should take the opinion of the local Neighborhood Council(s) into consideration when determining whether to grant or deny a permit;
  12. The City should not set minimums on the number of permits the agency in charge of the permitting process should be required to approve;
  13. If an applicant seeks a permit with a component that includes the on-site preparation of food, the Department of Health & Safety and the agency in charge of the permitting process should review the application for compliance with all relevant food-handling laws and deny the applicant if the applicant is not in full compliance;
  14. Depending on the types of food or products that an applicant seeks to vend, the applicant should be required to demonstrate compliance with any of the following on an as-needed basis: a Food Handling Certificate, FTB Resale License, Los Angeles County Health permit, and compliance with relevant federal, state, or local statutes, ordinances, or regulations;
  15. Upon receipt of a permit, the permitted street vendor should be required to openly and visibly post their permit during all hours they are engaged in vending, including setting up and tearing down a stationary location;
  16. The permit should clearly and visibly list: (a) hours of operation, (b) the location(s) in which they may engage in business, and (c) the types of products they may vend;
  17. Failure to adhere to the permitting, display, or operational limitations and requirements should lead to incrementally more severe punishments, including but not limited to: (a) impounding of any products on offer by a noncompliant vendor, (b) a fine that can incrementally increase, and (c) up to 6 months in jail for egregious violations or repeated violations by the same person(s).

The Memorial Walkway on the Granada Hills Veterans Memorial Park

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The Granada Hills Rotary Foundation is offering 75 laser-engraved memorial bricks to be added to the Memorial Walkway in the Granada Hills Veterans’ Park. The Foundation maintains the Granada Hills Veterans’ Park, which they refurbished in 2009 and 2010.

The memorial bricks have helped raise funds for the renovations and continue to help pay for maintenance. There are now 900 bricks which were sponsored and have names and messages from individuals, families of fallen and current soldiers, local businesses and community-based organizations. The Veterans’ Park’s pergola was made possible by the Granada Hills Improvement Association.

New landscaping, brick and cement work, flagpoles, monument and statue were supported by Jake Parunyan, Kenn Cleaners; Councilmember Mitchell Englander; former Councilman Greig Smith; the Granada Hills South Neighborhood Council; the Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council; the Department of Cultural Affairs; Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 2323; and the Granada Hills Rotary Foundation.

For more information or to request a brick, call (818)366-2020 or email [email protected].

Happy Independence Day

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July 4th is one of the best days of summer. Whether you take your party to the beach or stick with a backyard barbecue, remember that fireworks are illegal in the City of Los Angeles! Fireworks are dangerous – they can cause serious injury and death to people, damage homes and property, and potentially start brush fires.

The Emergency Management Department wants us to remind you to celebrate safely. For more safety preparation please visit http://emergency.lacity.org.

Here are our tips for a safe celebration:

  • Leave the fireworks to the professionals
  • Closely monitor kids swimming in pools to prevent drowning
  • Keep grills away from exterior walls and other structures that may burn
  • Stay hydrated – drink plenty of water throughout the day

LA Animals Services would also like you to know that they are preparing for their busiest time of year! They need your help to make space in our crowded shelters for the influx of terrified lost pets by fostering a pet for four days or more. If you won’t be in town or can’t foster at this time, please help us spread the word!

The loud sounds of July 4th fireworks frighten dogs and cats. If they get out of the house or yard, they run in fear. Then these frightened pets can’t find their way home and end up at our City shelters.

There are hundreds of wonderful animals of all ages, breeds and sizes waiting to be your temporary companion. Fostering is a great way to see what it’s like to have a four-legged addition to your family. Go to LAAnimalServices.com/foster to learn more or go to the City Animal Shelter nearest you and ask for a Foster application. They’ll get you fostering a pet right away!

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