Category: Granada Hills North

Turning Down the Volume on Party Houses

Wendy Moore steals images

L.A. City Council to impose new fines in crackdown on ‘party houses’

On Wednesday, February 21st, the City Council unanimously approved an ordinance to rein in out-of-control party houses in Los Angeles. The ordinance creates a series of escalating fines against the homeowners or those who rent from them, who use their homes for massive gatherings that disturb neighbors, block the public right-of-way, and threaten public safety. It includes increasing fines of up to $8,000. The ordinance also requires those who violate the ordinance to post a public notice for 30 days notifying neighbors of their unlawful conduct.

The new law, first proposed by Councilman David Ryu in 2016, expands the definition of “loud and unruly conduct” to include loud noises, obstruction of a street or public right-of-way, public intoxication and more.

The ordinance, which was supported by a variety of neighborhood councils and community organizations, is meant to dissuade property owners from renting out their homes to professional party-throwers and reduce the likelihood of future violations, freeing up law enforcement personnel for other purposes.

“Too often, we have seen people renting out their homes for the express purpose of turning it into a venue for elaborate events,” Councilmember Paul Koretz noted. “These aren’t barbeques or birthday parties, these are massive events with cover fees and throngs of people tossing cigarette butts in fire prone areas. Trying to control them has been a challenge for the City because the laws and jurisdictional authority have not been clear. This ordinance changes that.”

The new ordinance provides the City with a focused set of procedures and punishments to better address the phenomenon.

“With this new ordinance, the party is over for these completely out-of-hand neighborhood headaches,” said Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer. “With escalating fines into the thousands of dollars, this ordinance has the teeth to help us continue our house party prosecutions with greater effectiveness.”

Apologies in advance to party fans Chad Kroeger and JT Parr.

Granada Hills Emergency Plan Event

CITY-OF-LOS-ANGELES_Emergency-Disater-Flyer-Feb-2018

GRANADA HILLS NEIGHBORHOOD COUNCILS

THIS MEETING COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE!

ARE YOU PREPARED FOR THE BIG ONE?

(EARTHQUAKES, FIRE, AND OTHER DISASTERS)

February 1, 2018 at 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Our Granada Hills Emergency Plan Event will be held at Granada Hills Charter High School located

10535 Zelzah St. in Rawley Hall.

This meeting will help you to save lives including your own, your families, and your neighbors.   The Granada Hills Emergency Plan is dedicated to keep you and your loved ones as safe as possible.  During the meeting, you can hear local guest speakers and government officials present helpful information about the following:

  • Instruction Slideshow on Earthquakes
  • Emergency Contacts
  • Local Shelter Locations
  • Local School Pick Up Instructions
  • Utility Controls/Fire Instructions
  • Food and Tool Supply Check List
  • Community Emergency Response Team (CERT)
  • First Aid
  • Disaster Psychology
  • Map Your Neighborhood

Your Neighborhood Council Emergency Preparedness Alliance (NCEPA) tells us that during a major catastrophe we will all be on our own for 3 to 14 days or more; our emergency responders (LAPD and LAFD) do not have the resources to take care of all of us.  It is up to us to take care of ourselves and each other!

For more information please call Mike Benedetto (818) 723-8087 or visit www.GHSNC.org

Mailing Address: 11024 Balboa Blvd., Box 767; Granada Hills, CA 91344

Granada Hills Community Forum for the Los Angeles General Plan

GH General Plan Community Forum Flyer

Thursday, January 18, 2018, at 7:00PM

St. Euphrasia School Auditorium
17637 Mayerling St
Granada Hills, CA 91344

Help Shape the Future of Los Angeles

The Neighborhood Councils of Granada Hills want YOUR input on the update to the General Plan for the City of Los Angeles.

We will be soliciting community feedback on:
– Long-Term Growth
– Air Quality
– Conservation
– Housing
– Mobility
– Noise
– Open Space
– Public Services and Recreation
– Safety
– Anything YOU think is important

 

“Love is a Warm Blanket” Donation Drive

logo-2_vectorized

“Love is a Warm Blanket” is an annual blanket drive for the homeless in Los Angeles and beyond during Winter months, whose mission is to warm the hearts of the homeless and spread love with donations of blankets. New and gently used (washed) blankets will be collected at drop off sites until February 2018. You can also order directly through their Amazon wishlist.

Blankets are personally handed out to the general homeless population on the streets, at distribution events in communities including Skid Row, and to homeless shelter residents including emergency Winter shelters.

You can drop off a donation at any of the following locations.

The Valley Economic Alliance
5121 Van Nuys Blvd.
Sherman Oaks, 91403
Drop Off – MondayFriday8am-6pm
Note – Box on 2nd floor lobby.

The San Fernando Valley Rescue Mission
8756 Canby Ave.
Northridge, 91325
Drop Off – MondayFriday9am-5pm
Note: Buzz in through main gate.

Crossfit Lomita
2074 Pacific Coast Hwy
Lomita, 90717
Drop Off – MondayThursday5am-8:30pm
Friday5am-7:30pm
Saturday9am-12pm
Sunday9am-11am

GHNNC Proposal Regarding the Future Permitting Process for Street Vendors in the City of Los Angeles

GHNNC-Street-Vending-10-2017-1

https://www.ghnnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/GHNNC-Street-Vending-10-2017.pdf

WHEREAS, on January 06, 2015, Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council recommended that the City of Los Angeles should prohibit all street vending within the City limits;

WHEREAS, on March 01, 2016, Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council reaffirmed its opposition to street vending, and further resolved that if the City of Los Angeles chose to support street vending then Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council would, in principal, support Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Coalition’s conditions on such street vending;

WHEREAS, on February 15, 2017, the Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously to decriminalize the act of vending food and products along the streets of the City of Los Angeles;

WHEREAS, Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council now seeks to provide a more definite statement on the conditions under which the community would support a street vending ordinance for the City of Los Angeles;

WHEREAS, the City of Los Angeles is one of the most diverse and populous cities in the world, and is comprised of neighborhoods with such substantially different characters and needs that those neighborhoods will desire significantly different types and amounts of street vending;

WHEREAS, each of the ninety-seven Neighborhood Councils recognized by the City of Los Angeles is in the best place to determine what types, amounts, and locations of street vending their own community will be willing to support, able to maintain, cause the least detrimental effects associated with street vending, and be to the most benefit to the community;

NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council supports the following conditions and requirements on the permitting of street vending, and urges the Los Angeles City Council to integrate these suggestions into any ordinance in the City of Los Angeles that establishes a legal framework for permitted street vending:

  1. Prior to the City issuing a permit, any applicant seeking a permit should be required to submit to a review and obtain an opinion from the Neighborhood Council(s) wherein they seek to engage in vending activities;
  2. There should be a process for the local Neighborhood Council(s) to be able to recommend to the permitting agency: (a) conditions on the hours of operation, (b) conditions on the location(s) in which the applicant may conduct business within the neighborhood, and (c) conditions on the types of products they may vend;
  3. Prior to a permit-holder being issued a renewal for an existing permit, the permit-holder should be required to return to the local Neighborhood Council(s) and obtain another opinion under the same conditions as for new applications;
  4. There should be different lengths of time that a permit can be valid prior to requiring a renewal depending on whether food it being sold at the location: (a) permits for the sale of non-food (products-only) should be able to be approved for a period of either one-year, two-years, or three-years; and (b) permits for the sale of food and non-food products, or only food, should be renewed every year;
  5. There should be different categories of permit for street vendors that will primarily sell their food and/or products: (a) at a stationary location, or (b) in a manner that is non-stationary (i.e. using handcarts, at multiple temporary locations, using trucks, et cetera);
  6. An applicant seeking a permit for a stationary location should be required to submit a plan that describes: (a) the proposed location of their merchandise, (b) their plan for any deliveries or drop-offs, (c) the proposed locations of any signs, and (d) how their proposed location will permit the free flow of (i) foot traffic, and (ii) automobile traffic;
  7. Any permits issued for a non-stationary street vendor should specifically delineate the boundaries within which they are permitted to vend;
  8. No permit for a stationary street vending location should be issued within 100 feet of a single-family residence or a school;
  9. Non-stationary street vendors should be barred from selling anything (food or products) within 100 feet of a school;
  10. After obtaining an opinion by the local Neighborhood Council(s), and prior to the issuance of any permit, the agency in charge of the permitting process should review the application for compliance with all relevant laws and deny the applicant if the applicant is not in full compliance;
  11. The agency in charge of the permitting process should take the opinion of the local Neighborhood Council(s) into consideration when determining whether to grant or deny a permit;
  12. The City should not set minimums on the number of permits the agency in charge of the permitting process should be required to approve;
  13. If an applicant seeks a permit with a component that includes the on-site preparation of food, the Department of Health & Safety and the agency in charge of the permitting process should review the application for compliance with all relevant food-handling laws and deny the applicant if the applicant is not in full compliance;
  14. Depending on the types of food or products that an applicant seeks to vend, the applicant should be required to demonstrate compliance with any of the following on an as-needed basis: a Food Handling Certificate, FTB Resale License, Los Angeles County Health permit, and compliance with relevant federal, state, or local statutes, ordinances, or regulations;
  15. Upon receipt of a permit, the permitted street vendor should be required to openly and visibly post their permit during all hours they are engaged in vending, including setting up and tearing down a stationary location;
  16. The permit should clearly and visibly list: (a) hours of operation, (b) the location(s) in which they may engage in business, and (c) the types of products they may vend;
  17. Failure to adhere to the permitting, display, or operational limitations and requirements should lead to incrementally more severe punishments, including but not limited to: (a) impounding of any products on offer by a noncompliant vendor, (b) a fine that can incrementally increase, and (c) up to 6 months in jail for egregious violations or repeated violations by the same person(s).

The Memorial Walkway on the Granada Hills Veterans Memorial Park

Granada_Hills_Sign

The Granada Hills Rotary Foundation is offering 75 laser-engraved memorial bricks to be added to the Memorial Walkway in the Granada Hills Veterans’ Park. The Foundation maintains the Granada Hills Veterans’ Park, which they refurbished in 2009 and 2010.

The memorial bricks have helped raise funds for the renovations and continue to help pay for maintenance. There are now 900 bricks which were sponsored and have names and messages from individuals, families of fallen and current soldiers, local businesses and community-based organizations. The Veterans’ Park’s pergola was made possible by the Granada Hills Improvement Association.

New landscaping, brick and cement work, flagpoles, monument and statue were supported by Jake Parunyan, Kenn Cleaners; Councilmember Mitchell Englander; former Councilman Greig Smith; the Granada Hills South Neighborhood Council; the Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council; the Department of Cultural Affairs; Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 2323; and the Granada Hills Rotary Foundation.

For more information or to request a brick, call (818)366-2020 or email [email protected].

Translate »