Category: Transportation

Planning for the North San Fernando Valley BRT Project is Moving Forward

Planning for the North San Fernando Valley BRT Project is Moving Forward

The Measure M sales tax initiative, approved by voters in 2016, included funding for a bus rapid transit (BRT) project in the North San Fernando Valley.  Planning for the project began in July 2018 with the initiation of an Alternatives Analysis (AA) that evaluated three alternative routes stretching from the Chatsworth Metrolink Station to either the Sylmar/San Fernando Metrolink Station or the North Hollywood Red/Orange Line Station.

Metro recently completed the Alternatives Analysis Report for the North San Fernando Valley Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) project, which will be presented to the Metro Board of Directors Planning and Programming Committee this Wednesday, June 19 to seek approval before the Metro Board of Directors Regular Board Meeting on Thursday, June 27.

The Alternatives Analysis Report recommends that the Nordhoff-North Hollywood Route move forward to be evaluated during the next phase of environmental review. This alternative received the highest level of public support as it serves the CSUN Campus and connects to the regional rail system in North Hollywood. The use of Parthenia to pass under the 405 Freeway was also supported by the public because it would avoid traffic congestion on Nordhoff or Roscoe at the freeway, and it would serve multi-family residential areas in Panorama City. The Nordhoff-North Hollywood route also had higher ridership forecasts than the Nordhoff-Sylmar or Roscoe-North Hollywood routes.

What’s next?

At the Metro Board Committee and full Board meetings, the Directors will review the Alternatives Analysis Report and recommendations and provide staff with direction on how to proceed with the environmental review on the recommended route(s) and potential variations to the route(s). Please be on the lookout for our next e-newsletter that will include information on the Metro Board of Directors Meeting. Following Board approval, Metro intends to hold public meetings in the community in early August. These meetings will allow the public to comment on the scope of the project and to identify issues to be evaluated in the environmental review. Metro values your input.

Contact Metro

Phone: 213-418-3082
Email: [email protected]
Web: https://www.metro.net/projects/north-sfv-brt/

Thank you again for your participation in the North San Fernando Valley BRT Project. We will keep you informed when the community meetings are scheduled.

Read more »

Celebrate LA! LA Phil 100 x CicLAvia

ciclavia_laphil_093018_map_9_elevation

On Sunday, September 30th, CicLAvia is partnering with the LA Phil and Community Arts Resources (CARS) and clearing the roadways between Walt Disney Concert Hall and Hollywood, transforming them into an auto-free zone where you can walk, run, skate, scoot, bike, and wander however you like! Six hubs along the route will feature art, food trucks, screen-printing, kid-friendly fun, and dancing, as well as live music from LA’s best musicians. Think of it as an eight-mile free space saved just for you – do with it what you will!

GHNNC Street Repair Blitz 2018

street-repair-blitz

The Neighborhood Council Initiative (known to us as the Street Blitz), run by the Bureau of Street Services (BSS), will be in Granada Hills North real soon.  Our area will be assigned a two-person crew on a hot asphalt truck for one day to patch street potholes, pop-outs, small eroded or cracked areas, and do minor curb and sidewalk patching.  The crew is not equipped to handle tree roots that have damaged the street, or are they able to do any major repair for uplifted sidewalks.

Up to 15 locations will be inspected, so we’re looking for the worst spots that can be patched.  Depending on the conditions and amount of asphalt required, not all identified locations will get fixed during the blitz.  Remember, you can always report troublesome locations via 3-1-1. We’re asking for your help in preparing that list for submission to BSS. Since this is based on Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council boundaries, the locations MUST be north of the 118 freeway, west of the 405 freeway, and east of Aliso Canyon, up to the County line. Click here for a map of our boundaries.

Please make your submission no later than July 6.

Include the type of repair (pothole, pop-out, depression, minor lifted sidewalk, etc.), the address (preferred) or intersection, and which side of the street (north bound, east side, etc.). The more info you can provide, the less time spent by BSS trying to find the location. Remember, potholes and minor repairs only. Tree root damage is out, as are streets and sidewalks that require more extensive repairs.

Send your request to [email protected].

Mayor Garcetti: Proposed Gondola that Could Take Fans to Dodger Stadium

Dbts1bvUQAAsUzW

Here’s the first look at renderings of the proposed gondola that could take fans from Union Station straight to Dodger Stadium.

Los Angeles Transit Neighborhood Plans (LATNP) Program Workshops

Orange-Line-Meetings-1

The City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning is exploring ideas to encourage vibrant communities and employment hubs around the region’s growing transit network through the Los Angeles Transit Neighborhood Plans (LATNP) program. The planning effort looks out to the year 2040 and considers how new land use and zoning regulations for the neighborhoods around five Orange Line stations can promote active, walkable places and achieve State objectives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by planning for growth near transit. At these open houses, the community will have an opportunity to learn about:

• Community input received at workshops held in July 2016
• How community input is being incorporated into the initial concepts
• What the next steps in the planning process are

LA-Planning-1024×459

Both meetings will consist of an overview presentation, followed by an open house featuring stations covering each geographic area. Drop in any time during the open house to learn about the plan and provide feedback.

If you are unable to attend a meeting, visit www.latnp.org to:
• View materials and learn about the planning effort
• Provide feedback and ideas
• Sign up for the interest list

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Laura Krawczyk
[email protected]
213.978.1212

The Tripping Point Summit – The Valley Edition

Tripping-Point

9:30AM – 2PM (breakfast served at 9AM)
Panorama High School – 8015 Van Nuys Blvd, Panorama City, CA 91402

For over 40 years, our sidewalks, crosswalks, and bus stops have gone mostly unimproved in the City of Los Angeles. The Tripping Point goal is to highlight the importance of these public amenities on our quality of life. Come join the movement to support an even better Los Angeles with safe, accessible, and dignified travel options for all.

This past June we hosted a free Advocacy Summit to organize residents and build a constituency that can effectively advocate for fixing sidewalks, crosswalks, bus stops, and planting more trees in our communities. We hosted over 150 residents from across the City in Boyle Heights (recap here), and this month we’re taking this organizing effort to the Valley in Panorama City on Saturday October 21.

Food, childcare, and English/Spanish translation will be provided all at no cost. Please register so we know how many people to expect. And help us spread the word to your neighbors, friends, and family. No experience necessary – come learn with us! Register today! 

Come join your neighbors, elected officials, and department staff and learn how to improve your neighborhood! 

  • How to Communicate with Decisionmakers
  • How to get a Street Tree
  • How to get a Sidewalk Ramp
  • Sidewalk Repair Program basics
  • Learn about the People St program
  • Meet local elected officials and City of LA staff
  • Help grow the movement for fixing #LAsidewalks by adding in your ideas and experiences

With an incredible lineup of workshops and trainings, you’ll gain new skills, strategies, and insights that will help you champion positive change in your community.

Register here for the Tripping Point – the Valley Edition
LA has a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to align billions of dollars, and leverage transportation funds like Measure M, SB1 and Willits Settlement funds, to prioritize and address these concerns. Learn how to make change, who to ask for what, and when to make your voice heard to improve your neighborhood for all.

Thanks to all our partners working to make this happen: Los Angeles WalksLURNSouthern California Resource Services for Independent LivingKoreatown Youth Community CenterAARPAmerican Heart AssociationEmpowerLAOutfront/JCDecauxKaiser PermanenteFirst 5 LA, and Transit Center

Senator Hertzberg Calls on Metro to Amend its Expenditure Plan, Include Project for CSUN

Traffic-Alert-Ad_LADN_6-15-16thumb.jpg

The $120 billion plan for LA County transportation improvements over the next 50 years provides no guarantees for state’s largest CSU campus

SACRAMENTO – Sen. Bob Hertzberg, D-Van Nuys, issued a call today to the Los Angeles County Metropolitan (Metro) Board to consider amending its expenditure plan for a proposed sales tax measure scheduled to be placed on the November ballot and include specific projects benefiting
CSUN.

The board is scheduled to vote on June 23rd on the plan and placing the tax measure on the ballot. If approved by voters, the sales tax increase would provide an estimated $120 billion over the next 50 years to fund transportation infrastructure improvements throughout the county.
Read more »

Metro Unveils Ballot Proposal to Transform LA Transit

83e86906-097e-4635-8855-3f6e99385d09.jpg
Metro released the details of a proposed measure for the November 2016 ballot that aims to raise as much as $120 billion for new highway and transit projects in LA County. The spending plan includes improvements to existing infrastructure and programs to facilitate active transportation, including bicycling and walking paths to be built over the next four decades.
According to Metro, the potential ballot measure would ask voters to increase the countywide sales tax by a half-cent for 40 years and to continue an existing tax (Measure R) for an extra 18 years, meaning both would potentially run through 2057.
Metro Board Director Paul Krekorian, who has pushed for major improvements in the San Fernando Valley, including upgrades to the Orange Line, new bus routes and increased efficiency throughout the system, called the plan a “golden opportunity to transform transportation for the Valley.”
“The San Fernando Valley has waited far too long for its fair share of transportation investment, and now we are on track to getting it,” said Krekorian. “Metro’s staff proposal shows that the past two years of hard work by Valley leaders, community advocates and business groups in preparation for a new transit ballot measure is paying off. Because we have always insisted that any measure must include the Valley’s top transit priorities, all of these projects are on the list to get funded and built quickly. This proposal gives the Valley a golden opportunity to transform its transportation network and relieve congestion, and we should seize it.
“As these recommendations move forward, I will continue to fight for these priorities and also push for more investment and additional projects to better connect all parts of the Valley.”
Metro invites the public to give input on the proposal by emailing [email protected]. For more information and to read the full plan, visit theplan.metro.net.
16-0302_web_Plan-Webpage_r3_2-graphic-1-rail-1-1

City Aims to Cut Annual Traffic Deaths by 200

14470172878_37eb23f49d_b

More than 200 people die on LA streets each year, and most of those deaths happen on just six percent of streets.

Sitting at a desk in the middle of a Boyle Heights street, Mayor Eric Garcetti today signed an executive directive aimed at cutting traffic fatalities in the city to zero by 2025.

The directive calls for reaching the goal, dubbed “Vision Zero,” by creating safer streets, enforcing traffic laws and conducting more public education.

The mayoral action sets up a steering committee consisting of mayoral, police, fire, public works and county public health staff that will target areas most in need of safety upgrades. Those officials are to report back on Dec. 1 with suggestions for cutting traffic fatalities 20 percent by 2017. Read more »

New Intersection Improvements for Balboa Blvd. & San Fernando Rd

From Councilmember Mitchell Englander:

This Monday, I join the Bureau of Engineering and the Department of Transportation to cut the ribbon on several new improvements to the intersection of Balboa Boulevard and San Fernando Road. Improvements to the intersection include the constructed two left turn lanes, a new dedicated lane for traffic heading south onto Balboa Blvd. and a new street light and traffic signal.

In 2007, we identified several projects along this Balboa Blvd corridor as being critical to mobility in Council District 12. The stretch of Balboa Boulevard between the 118 Freeway and Foothill Blvd is one of the most congested in the Valley during peak hours, with over 20,000 commuters passing through it daily.

This intersection serves as an alternative for commuters traveling to and from the Santa Clarita Valley, but we feel increased impacts when there is an incident on the freeway, or during long periods of heavy freeway construction.

Thank you to the City of Los Angeles’ Bureau of Engineering and Department of Transportation for helping to make these improvements a reality. These improvements will have a tremendous impact on the quality of life of local residents.

Mitchell Englander, Councilmember Twelfth District

Grading Los Angeles’ Streets

la-interactive-map-la-street-quality

L.A. full of roads to ruin for cars

The city gives its road network an average grade of C. But a Times analysis finds wide disparities, and they’re not driven by wealth or political power.

Explore pavement quality ratings for each of the 68,000 street segments in L.A., graded from A to F.

Gregory Leskin

From the L.A. Times, May 4, 2013

A drive along Angus Street in hilly Silver Lake requires navigating a gantlet of buckled concrete slabs and dirt-filled cracks.

But on South Seabluff Drive in Playa Vista the ride is smooth, the pavement is black and you can smell the fresh asphalt.

Despite the city’s best efforts to keep up with the constant flood of road repairs, Los Angeles is a city divided — by its potholes, cracks and ruts.

Interactive map: See your street’s grade

A Times analysis of street inspection data found Read more »

Boost For Bikes: City Council Allows Car Parking To Be Swapped For Bike Spaces

3388186053_6024ffb16d_z

3388186053_6024ffb16d_z.jpeg
Bike rack (Photo by via the LAist Featured Photos pool)

It took a long time but the Los Angeles City Council has passed an ordinance that will dramatically increase the number of parking spaces for bikes in new developments.

The Bike Parking Ordinance will allow new developments—both residential and commercial—to swap some parking spots for bikes in lieu of parking spots for cars. There are also rules standardizing bike parking space to ensure that they’re safe, secure and accessible.

One car spot can be replaced by four bikes for up to 30 percent of the required number of spaces for commercial developments that are near transit lines. At other commercial buildings not near transit lines, the number is 20 percent. For buildings with less than 20 required car parking spaces, up to 4 parking spaces may be swapped for bike parking. Residential buildings can replace up to 10 percent of car spaces with bike parking.

All new developments with few exceptions will need to have at least 2 parking spaces for bikes, and that can include the city’s bike corrals. The ordinance also has rules about what can and cannot be considered a parking spot. Spaces should be well-lit and easily accessible from the street. Short-term parking should be outside the building and easy to spot before you even walk in. There should be signs directing people to long-term parking, if it’s not immediately obvious where it is.

For more information, you can read the full ordinance (h/t Curbed LA and Streetsblog).

Translate »