Be a Food Waste Warrior, Join the Los Angeles Food Waste Grant Challenge

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The City of Los Angeles is proud to announce a new Food Waste Grant Challenge as part of the City’s ongoing efforts to divert waste from landfills. Over 40% of edible food moving through LA goes to waste, yet more than half a million Angelenos struggle with food insecurity. Wasted food is a social, environmental and economic problem. Combating food waste regenerates resources, saves money for households, and feeds people.

Grant proposals are due on December 8, 2017. Awards will be announced in mid-December, with a target start date of all projects on January 22, 2018. Project categories include food waste prevention, food donation, upcycled use (including animal feed or fuel) and composting.

For more details, visit http://dpw.lacity.org/blog/los-angeles-food-waste-grant-challenge

GHNNC Proposal Regarding the Future Permitting Process for Street Vendors in the City of Los Angeles

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https://www.ghnnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/GHNNC-Street-Vending-10-2017.pdf

WHEREAS, on January 06, 2015, Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council recommended that the City of Los Angeles should prohibit all street vending within the City limits;

WHEREAS, on March 01, 2016, Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council reaffirmed its opposition to street vending, and further resolved that if the City of Los Angeles chose to support street vending then Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council would, in principal, support Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Coalition’s conditions on such street vending;

WHEREAS, on February 15, 2017, the Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously to decriminalize the act of vending food and products along the streets of the City of Los Angeles;

WHEREAS, Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council now seeks to provide a more definite statement on the conditions under which the community would support a street vending ordinance for the City of Los Angeles;

WHEREAS, the City of Los Angeles is one of the most diverse and populous cities in the world, and is comprised of neighborhoods with such substantially different characters and needs that those neighborhoods will desire significantly different types and amounts of street vending;

WHEREAS, each of the ninety-seven Neighborhood Councils recognized by the City of Los Angeles is in the best place to determine what types, amounts, and locations of street vending their own community will be willing to support, able to maintain, cause the least detrimental effects associated with street vending, and be to the most benefit to the community;

NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council supports the following conditions and requirements on the permitting of street vending, and urges the Los Angeles City Council to integrate these suggestions into any ordinance in the City of Los Angeles that establishes a legal framework for permitted street vending:

  1. Prior to the City issuing a permit, any applicant seeking a permit should be required to submit to a review and obtain an opinion from the Neighborhood Council(s) wherein they seek to engage in vending activities;
  2. There should be a process for the local Neighborhood Council(s) to be able to recommend to the permitting agency: (a) conditions on the hours of operation, (b) conditions on the location(s) in which the applicant may conduct business within the neighborhood, and (c) conditions on the types of products they may vend;
  3. Prior to a permit-holder being issued a renewal for an existing permit, the permit-holder should be required to return to the local Neighborhood Council(s) and obtain another opinion under the same conditions as for new applications;
  4. There should be different lengths of time that a permit can be valid prior to requiring a renewal depending on whether food it being sold at the location: (a) permits for the sale of non-food (products-only) should be able to be approved for a period of either one-year, two-years, or three-years; and (b) permits for the sale of food and non-food products, or only food, should be renewed every year;
  5. There should be different categories of permit for street vendors that will primarily sell their food and/or products: (a) at a stationary location, or (b) in a manner that is non-stationary (i.e. using handcarts, at multiple temporary locations, using trucks, et cetera);
  6. An applicant seeking a permit for a stationary location should be required to submit a plan that describes: (a) the proposed location of their merchandise, (b) their plan for any deliveries or drop-offs, (c) the proposed locations of any signs, and (d) how their proposed location will permit the free flow of (i) foot traffic, and (ii) automobile traffic;
  7. Any permits issued for a non-stationary street vendor should specifically delineate the boundaries within which they are permitted to vend;
  8. No permit for a stationary street vending location should be issued within 100 feet of a single-family residence or a school;
  9. Non-stationary street vendors should be barred from selling anything (food or products) within 100 feet of a school;
  10. After obtaining an opinion by the local Neighborhood Council(s), and prior to the issuance of any permit, the agency in charge of the permitting process should review the application for compliance with all relevant laws and deny the applicant if the applicant is not in full compliance;
  11. The agency in charge of the permitting process should take the opinion of the local Neighborhood Council(s) into consideration when determining whether to grant or deny a permit;
  12. The City should not set minimums on the number of permits the agency in charge of the permitting process should be required to approve;
  13. If an applicant seeks a permit with a component that includes the on-site preparation of food, the Department of Health & Safety and the agency in charge of the permitting process should review the application for compliance with all relevant food-handling laws and deny the applicant if the applicant is not in full compliance;
  14. Depending on the types of food or products that an applicant seeks to vend, the applicant should be required to demonstrate compliance with any of the following on an as-needed basis: a Food Handling Certificate, FTB Resale License, Los Angeles County Health permit, and compliance with relevant federal, state, or local statutes, ordinances, or regulations;
  15. Upon receipt of a permit, the permitted street vendor should be required to openly and visibly post their permit during all hours they are engaged in vending, including setting up and tearing down a stationary location;
  16. The permit should clearly and visibly list: (a) hours of operation, (b) the location(s) in which they may engage in business, and (c) the types of products they may vend;
  17. Failure to adhere to the permitting, display, or operational limitations and requirements should lead to incrementally more severe punishments, including but not limited to: (a) impounding of any products on offer by a noncompliant vendor, (b) a fine that can incrementally increase, and (c) up to 6 months in jail for egregious violations or repeated violations by the same person(s).

LA Considers Controversial Airbnb Regulations

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Proponents of short-term rentals say many depend on it to cover their mortgage while critics say it exacerbates the housing shortage.

A Los Angeles City Council Committee is set to debate Tuesday proposed regulations for Airbnb and short-term housing rental companies in an effort to please both passionate advocates of the practice and those who say it is contributing to the city’s housing shortage.

The highest concentration of listings appear to be in neighborhoods like Venice, Hollywood, Mid-Wilshire, Echo Park, Downtown, East Hollywood, Beverly Grove, Los Feliz and Sherman Oaks, according to a Department of City Planning report.

The Planning and Land Use Management Committee last discussed a proposed ordinance on home sharing in June, when it heard several hours of testimony from public speakers and also asked for a number of reports from city staff.

So many people showed up at the meeting an overflow area was set up outside on City Hall’s south lawn with an audio feed directly into the council chamber so that more people could voice their opinion.

The city does not have an ordinance regulating Airbnb, which connects travelers with hosts looking to rent out their home or a bedroom in their home, but struck a deal with the company last year for it to pay hotel taxes on behalf of its hosts under a three-year agreement, even though short-term rentals are illegal in many residential neighborhoods.

Among the most controversial parts of the proposed ordinance is limiting the number of rental days per host to 180 days a year. Other cities have enacted short-term rental limitations, with Santa Monica limiting them to 60 days and San Francisco limiting them to 90 days.

Los Angeles projects it could collect over $33 million in taxes from Airbnb for the upcoming fiscal year, and has banked on the number in its approved budget, but the company has warned that capping rental days would significantly cut into that number.

Many speakers at the last meeting told the committee that limiting the number of rental days could severely impact their finances or even their ability to keep paying their mortgage.

While Airbnb is fighting the 180-day ordinance, the city has been receiving pressure from other groups to pass a more stringent one. In March, a group that included representatives of the Venice Community Housing Corporation, the Coalition for Economic Survival and the California Hotel & Lodging Association called on the city to limit rentals to 60 days because it said Airbnb is helping create a housing shortage for L.A. residents.

At the June meeting, the committee asked the Department of City Planning to produce an analysis of the current state of short-term rentals in the city, best practices with other cities and provide answers to other related questions.

According to the department’s report, there are approximately 23,000 unique short-term-rental listings within Los Angeles. Of these 23,000 active unique listings, approximately 15,900 are “entire home” listings, of which there are a total of 11,400 renting for more than 90 days in the last year, with about 6,600 rented for more than 180 days.

This total represents “a relatively small portion of the 1.45 million total housing units in the city,” the report found, but added that the “fast growth of the practice and its concentration in certain neighborhoods threatens housing availability, affordability and residential stability of an increasing number of communities throughout Los Angeles.”

https://patch.com/california/northridge/s/g9hzh/la-considers-controversial-airbnb-regulations

The Memorial Walkway on the Granada Hills Veterans Memorial Park

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The Granada Hills Rotary Foundation is offering 75 laser-engraved memorial bricks to be added to the Memorial Walkway in the Granada Hills Veterans’ Park. The Foundation maintains the Granada Hills Veterans’ Park, which they refurbished in 2009 and 2010.

The memorial bricks have helped raise funds for the renovations and continue to help pay for maintenance. There are now 900 bricks which were sponsored and have names and messages from individuals, families of fallen and current soldiers, local businesses and community-based organizations. The Veterans’ Park’s pergola was made possible by the Granada Hills Improvement Association.

New landscaping, brick and cement work, flagpoles, monument and statue were supported by Jake Parunyan, Kenn Cleaners; Councilmember Mitchell Englander; former Councilman Greig Smith; the Granada Hills South Neighborhood Council; the Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council; the Department of Cultural Affairs; Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 2323; and the Granada Hills Rotary Foundation.

For more information or to request a brick, call (818)366-2020 or email [email protected].

Los Angeles Transit Neighborhood Plans (LATNP) Program Workshops

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The City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning is exploring ideas to encourage vibrant communities and employment hubs around the region’s growing transit network through the Los Angeles Transit Neighborhood Plans (LATNP) program. The planning effort looks out to the year 2040 and considers how new land use and zoning regulations for the neighborhoods around five Orange Line stations can promote active, walkable places and achieve State objectives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by planning for growth near transit. At these open houses, the community will have an opportunity to learn about:

• Community input received at workshops held in July 2016
• How community input is being incorporated into the initial concepts
• What the next steps in the planning process are

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Both meetings will consist of an overview presentation, followed by an open house featuring stations covering each geographic area. Drop in any time during the open house to learn about the plan and provide feedback.

If you are unable to attend a meeting, visit www.latnp.org to:
• View materials and learn about the planning effort
• Provide feedback and ideas
• Sign up for the interest list

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Laura Krawczyk
[email protected]
213.978.1212

The Tripping Point Summit – The Valley Edition

Tripping-Point

9:30AM – 2PM (breakfast served at 9AM)
Panorama High School – 8015 Van Nuys Blvd, Panorama City, CA 91402

For over 40 years, our sidewalks, crosswalks, and bus stops have gone mostly unimproved in the City of Los Angeles. The Tripping Point goal is to highlight the importance of these public amenities on our quality of life. Come join the movement to support an even better Los Angeles with safe, accessible, and dignified travel options for all.

This past June we hosted a free Advocacy Summit to organize residents and build a constituency that can effectively advocate for fixing sidewalks, crosswalks, bus stops, and planting more trees in our communities. We hosted over 150 residents from across the City in Boyle Heights (recap here), and this month we’re taking this organizing effort to the Valley in Panorama City on Saturday October 21.

Food, childcare, and English/Spanish translation will be provided all at no cost. Please register so we know how many people to expect. And help us spread the word to your neighbors, friends, and family. No experience necessary – come learn with us! Register today! 

Come join your neighbors, elected officials, and department staff and learn how to improve your neighborhood! 

  • How to Communicate with Decisionmakers
  • How to get a Street Tree
  • How to get a Sidewalk Ramp
  • Sidewalk Repair Program basics
  • Learn about the People St program
  • Meet local elected officials and City of LA staff
  • Help grow the movement for fixing #LAsidewalks by adding in your ideas and experiences

With an incredible lineup of workshops and trainings, you’ll gain new skills, strategies, and insights that will help you champion positive change in your community.

Register here for the Tripping Point – the Valley Edition
LA has a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to align billions of dollars, and leverage transportation funds like Measure M, SB1 and Willits Settlement funds, to prioritize and address these concerns. Learn how to make change, who to ask for what, and when to make your voice heard to improve your neighborhood for all.

Thanks to all our partners working to make this happen: Los Angeles WalksLURNSouthern California Resource Services for Independent LivingKoreatown Youth Community CenterAARPAmerican Heart AssociationEmpowerLAOutfront/JCDecauxKaiser PermanenteFirst 5 LA, and Transit Center