DWP Info Phone Line and Web Site Now Active

DWP LogoThe DWP has activated its special phone line and website to allow residents to find out what their water usage allotment is. This will allow residents to determine if they need to conserve more water to avoid the higher rates under the DWP’s water shortage measures.

DWP Phone Line: (800) Dial DWP
www.LADWP.com

Los Angeles is suffering a serious drought plus significant water supply shortages.
To boost conservation, DWP has implemented higher water-shortage rates and lawn watering restrictions. About 85% of single-family homes and 99% of apartment buildings in the 12th District will remain in the lowest water usage tier, so their rates won’t go up.

Single-family households are allocated a certain amount of water at the lowest rate – Tier 1. This allotment is determined by three things: lot size, location and number of household members. The higher rate is for every additional gallon of water used above that. This means that you will not be penalized if you have already been conserving water, because the Tier is not set based on your own use.

“Los Angeles: Structure of a City Government” online download now available for free.

LA Book CoverEverything about L.A. city government‑‑from who fixes potholes to how people run for city Council‑‑can be found in the new edition of Los Angeles: Structure of a City Government, published by the League of Women Voters of Los Angeles. To commemorate the publication, the League donated a total of 6,800 copies to the city of Los Angeles during a presentation in City Hall council chambers on November 7, 2006. It has distributed the remaining 7,200 copies to civic groups and residents throughout Los Angeles.

Written by Dr. Raphael J. Sonenshein of California State University, Fullerton, and recently appointed Executive Director of the Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Review commission, the publication is an entirely new and expanded version of a book first published by the League in 1964 and most recently updated in 1986. The John Randolph Haynes and Dora Haynes Foundation funded the book.

Dr. Sonenshein’s edition adds a new chapter to the long and valued history of the League’s published guides to the government of Los Angeles. with his invaluable experience as Executive Director of the City of Los Angeles Appointed Charter Reform commission, his book aptly serves as an introduction to this new governing document for the 21st century.

Los Angeles: Structure of a City Government includes sections on departments, commissions and agencies that did not exist prior to the passage of the 2000 charter. Other features of the 208‑page book include a newly revised city organizational chart, a recommended reading list, website resources, and an index, weaving the history of Los Angeles’ civic infrastructure throughout, it serves as an invaluable educational resource for people of all ages.

Click here to download your copy of the book.

GHNNC is represented well among Valley Regional Congress award winners

Scott Manatt Budget & Finance Chair of the Year
Scott Manatt, Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council
Sue DeVandry Outreach Chair of the Year
Sue DeVandry, Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council

Thank you for all the hard work that you have done as well as the work that you are currently doing for our council.

The city of Granada Hills (including the Granada Hills South Neighborhood Council and the Granada Hills Rotary Club) took 5 awards out of 18 across the entire San Fernando Valley, so we did very well.

These award winners were honored at the Valley Regional Congress Event luncheon on Saturday, May 30th.

GHNNC is sponsoring Citrus Sunday this Sunday, May 3!!!

Citrus Sunday Logo

Citrus Sunday is coming up fast, and the Neighborhood Councils, community groups, Fire Stations and hundreds of volunteers that are joining our effort are preparing for a record harvest on Sunday, May 3.

Northridge East, Northridge West, Granada Hills North, Granada Hills South, West Hills, North Hills West, and Chatsworth Neighborhood Councils, as well as the San Fernando Valley Jaycees have agreed to “adopt” Fire Stations that will serve as fruit drop-off locations. Volunteers from the Neighborhood Councils will be on hand to assist people arriving to drop off citrus fruit picked on Citrus Sunday, and ensure that the operation goes smoothly.

Granada Hills North Neighborhood Council has adopted Fire Station 18, and we encourage you to bring as much citrus fruit as you can to the fire station on Sunday. flyer

Fire Station 18
12050 Balboa Blvd.
Granada Hills, CA 91344

Please be part of this effort! Together we will bring tens of thousands of pounds of fresh, nutritious fruit to needy families served at local food banks operated by the Valley Interfaith Council (VIC).

Participating is easy:
1. Pick oranges, grapefruits, or other citrus fruit (up to three days in advance of Citrus Sunday).
2. Wash them and put them in plastic bags.
3. Drop them off at participating Fire Stations between 10:00 am and 3:00 pm on Sunday, May 3, and VIC will distribute it at their food banks.

If you can’t pick the fruit on your own, call (818) 756-8501 and we will try to assist you.

For a list of participating Fire Stations, and other information on Citrus Sunday, visit www.CD12.org and click Citrus Sunday or call (818) 756-8501.

Big Sunday Weekend: May 1 and 2

Big Sunday Weekend is coming soon! There are so many opportunities nearby to make a positive difference in your neighborhood. For your convenience, GHNNC has searched through all 450+ projects across Southern California and listed the local ones on our Event Calendar.
log-bigsunday2From the Big Sunday website:
Big Sunday’s mission is to build community through community service. Volunteers come from all kinds of neighborhoods, and work in all sorts of neighborhoods, too. The idea is that everyone has some way that they can help somebody else.

Their biggest event each year is Big Sunday Weekend—always in the spring, usually in late April or early May. That’s when thousands of people from Southern California, of all ages and all backgrounds, work together at hundreds of nonprofits, schools and other agencies that need their help. Last year on Big Sunday Weekend, 50,000 volunteers turned out—some as individuals, others with their families, still others as part of a class, church, synagogue, mosque, business or club—to lend a hand at more than 500 different projects from San Diego to Solvang, making Big Sunday Weekend one of the largest regional community service events in America.

On Big Sunday Weekend there are opportunities for every passion, talent, skill and age. Projects are scheduled throughout the weekend, and can last anywhere from one hour to two full days. Big Sunday Weekend also includes special events such as art shows, sports days, yard sales and blood drives. Plus, last year on Big Sunday Weekend, we gave away more than 85 truckloads of clothes, books, food, furniture, musical instruments, luggage, toys and other items.

For many people, Big Sunday Weekend is just the beginning of an involvement that continues throughout the year. Many volunteers build lasting relationships with the nonprofits they first help on Big Sunday Weekend. All year long—and for years to come—they continue to volunteer, mentor, serve on boards and contribute goods, services and money to support these worthy causes.

By the way, Big Sunday is a registered 501(c)(3) organization. Big Sunday projects have no religious or political agenda, and there is never any charge for volunteers to participate. Big Sunday is completely underwritten by cash and in-kind donations.

Earthquake Preparedness

On July 29th, the Los Angeles region experienced a 5.4 scale earthquake. It was a reminder and a warning that we live in earthquake country and we need to be prepared for the big one. Luckily, it was uneventful compared to the 6.6 Sylmar earthquake in 1971 and the 6.7 Northridge earthquake in 1994. Both quakes claimed many lives and caused billions of dollars in property damage. It’s been over ten years since the Northridge earthquake and experts regularly say it is not a matter of if, but when another earthquake of this magnitude will occur. Take a moment to click on the links and read through all the earthquake preparedness tip sheets. Requires Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader (Free download).

Having the right information and being prepared means that we are saving lives.