Welcome the New Senior Lead Officer to Our Neighborhood!

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Devonshire Community, I would like to announce the selection of Devonshire’s Newest Senior Lead Officer, Police Officer III Phillip Sellers.

Officer Sellers will be working Basic Car 17A49, filling the position left by retired Senior Lead Officer Jannie Angeles. He was selected from a pool of highly qualified candidates. Officer Sellers has served the Devonshire community for many years. He will be an asset to the Devonshire SLO office as he continues to serve the community.

Thank you.

BRYAN D. LIUM
Commanding Officer
Devonshire Area

State and SoCal Gas Settle Over Aliso Gas Leak for $119.5 Million

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The news of an tentative settlement between state officials and SoCal has many residents involved in a class action suit nervous.

A $119.5 million settlement agreement was announced Wednesday to resolve claims by several governmental bodies stemming from the massive Aliso Canyon methane leak — the biggest in U.S. history — that sent more than 100,000 tons of natural gas into neighborhoods around Porter Ranch.

According to a statement released by Southern California Gas Co. just before the start of a news conference to detail the agreement, the settlement with the Los Angeles City Attorney’s Office, the County of Los Angeles, the California Attorney General’s office and the California Air Resources Board resolves “all outstanding claims by those government bodies against the company related to the 2015-2016 natural gas leak at the Aliso Canyon natural gas storage facility.”

“Under the terms of the $119.5 million settlement agreement, SoCalGas will, among other things, reimburse city, county and state governments for costs associated with their response to the leak; establish a program with the California Air Resources Board to mitigate the methane emissions from the leak; and fund local environmental benefit projects to be administered by the government parties,” according to the statement.

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, City Councilman Mitch Englander and county Supervisors Kathryn Barger and Hilda Solis were scheduled to discuss the settlement at a 10 a.m. news conference.

The gas stemmed from an underground storage facility owned by the company.

Officials said the invisible gas was flowing for about four months in what is being called the worst methane leak in history. An estimated 8,000 residents evacuated their homes, and people from the area said they experienced health issues such as headaches, nosebleeds and nausea.

A class-action suit involving around 9,000 plaintiffs has been filed again SoCalGas. People affiliated with the suit said they resented reports of a settlement since it indicated that a state investigation of the leak will end even though, they claim, the leaking has not stopped.

Bret Lane, the utility’s president and chief operating officer, said SoCalGas “is delivering on our commitment to the governor and the people of California to fully mitigate the methane emissions from the leak at our Aliso Canyon facility.”

“The settlement will also help California meet its ambitious climate goals by advancing projects that capture methane from dairy farms and waste and convert that energy into renewable natural gas for use in transportation,” he said. “SoCalGas is pleased to have worked with the Attorney General’s Office, the Air Resources Board, the Los Angeles City Attorney and the County of Los Angeles to resolve these matters for the people of California.”

The gas leak, which was discovered in October 2015 and continued emanating methane until February 2016, poured an estimated 109,000 tons of methane into the air and forced an estimated 15,000 residents to temporarily relocate.

Limited operations resumed at the facility in late July 2017 with the blessing of state regulators. Efforts by Los Angeles County officials to block the resumed operations failed in court.

Last year, SoCalGas reached an $8.5 million settlement with South Coast Air Quality Management District over the leak, which included $1 million in funding for an SCAQMD-sponsored health study on the impacts of the leak, although county health officials said that $35 million to $40 million would be needed for an adequate study.

Los Angeles County Launches Homeless Outreach Portal Online and Through 2-1-1 Phone

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Did you see someone experiencing homelessness who needs help? Notice a homeless neighbor who seems to be struggling with their physical and/or mental health? You can help them by filling out an outreach request at www.la-hop.org or by dialing 2-1-1 and reporting any specific concerns you may have regarding the person’s well-being.

LA-HOP (Homeless Outreach Program) is a service designed to assist people experiencing homelessness in Los Angeles County with outreach services. Calling LA-HOP will dispatch a homeless services outreach team to the area. Homeless individuals or others may call the line when seeking help for themselves or others. This program is funded by Measure H, the County of Los Angeles special sales tax increase passed by the voters in 2017 that specifically funds services, shelter, and permanent rental subsidies for people experiencing homelessness.

211 LA is the central source for providing information and referrals for all health, human services and social services in LA County. The 2-1-1 phone line is open 24 hours, 7 days a week, with trained Community Resource Advisors prepared to offer help with any situation, any time. If you are calling from outside Los Angeles County or cannot directly dial 2-1-1, call (800) 339-6993.

Workshop: Great Green Space for a Climate-Smart LA

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Want to help your neighborhood maximize green space and be more climate resilient? Want to make the best and most equitable use of Measure A and Prop 68 funds for local parks?

Join us for a hands-on workshop with Fernando Cazares of the Trust for Public Land on how to make the most of your neighborhood green space—and add to it where it’s needed most. We’ll also have updates on our committee work on community oil drilling, trees, water, environmental health, and more, plus time to share what YOU are up to!

The Trust for Public Land has created a user-friendly tool to help city leaders and residents design, fund, and build climate-smart parks and green spaces where they can provide the most equitable and environmental bang for the buck.

Learn to use this tool to design and enhance your neighborhood “green infrastructure” serving four objectives: Connect (trails and transit lines to connect us), Cool (provide shade in key areas), Absorb (reduce flooding and recharge drinking water supplies while saving energy for water management), and Protect (strategically place green space to buffer cities from climate hazards). Check out a preview here!

BYOB—bring your own reusable water bottle or coffee mug

Connect with others to carpool to the event! https://www.groupcarpool.com/t/x5zas4

Saturday, August 25 from 10 am to 1 pm

Boyle Heights Technology Youth Center
1600 E 4th St
Los Angeles, CA 90033

RSVP at https://www.ncsa.la/great_green_space

Discuss NC Reform & Community Interest Stakeholders with the Board of Neighborhood Commissioners: July 23 (Valley) / Aug 7 (East LA) / Aug 15 (location TBD) / Aug 20 (DTLA)

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As part of their next few meetings, the Board of Neighborhood Commissioners will hold town hall style discussions of the City Council’s Neighborhood Council Reform motion (CF 18-0467). You are invited to join their conversation, and help shape the future of the NC system.

One key part of the discussion will focus on Community Interest Stakeholders. Community Interest Stakeholdership of a Neighborhood Council is currently defined as engaging in “ongoing and substantial participation” in the community that NC serves, but what does “ongoing and substantial” mean as a qualification?

Community Interest Stakeholders are just one item on the list of reforms proposed for the Neighborhood Council system. If you haven’t yet read the entire NC Reform proposal, please read it here: http://tiny.cc/NCReform

Here are the upcoming Commission meeting dates where you will be able to share your feedback on these NC reform-related issues:

Special Meeting – Monday, July 23, 2018 @ 6:00 pm
Kaiser Permanente Panorama City
Medical Office 2 – Classroom 1 + 2
13730 Roscoe Blvd Panorama City, CA 91402
(free on-site parking available)

Get the 7/23 agenda: http://ens.lacity.org/done/agendas/doneagendas197123085_07232018.pdf

Regular Meeting – Tuesday August 7, 2018 @ 6:00 pm
Boyle Heights City Hall
2130 E 1st St, Los Angeles, CA 90033 
(free on-site parking available)

Special Meeting – Wednesday August 15, 2018
time & location TBD

Regular Meeting – Monday August 20, 2018 @ 1:00 pm
City Hall
10th Floor Conference Center (Room 1050)
200 North Spring St, Los Angeles, CA 90012
(street parking only)

New Tree Removal Notification for Neighborhood Councils

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The Bureau of Street Services’ Urban Forestry Division (UFD) is now copying EmpowerLA when a permit has been filed with UFD and has been deemed complete to move to the notification phase.  Once EmpowerLA receives a notification with the address of the tree to be removed, staff will identify which Neighborhood Council the tree(s) is located in and forward the notification to the board.

A Neighborhood Council can weigh in on the removal of the tree(s) in the following way:  

If the removal is for 1 or 2 trees, the UFD provides a 3 day notice to the affected Council District, the Community Forest Advisory Committee and the affected Neighborhood Council.  If no objections are raised within the 3 days, the tree(s) will be removed shortly thereafter.  The board members should contact their City Council Office if your Neighborhood Council has any concerns about the tree(s) removal.  

If the removal is for 3 or more trees, the UFD provides a 3 day notice to the affected Council District, the Board of Public Works, the Community Forest Advisory Committee and the affected Neighborhood Council.  The UFD is also required to submit a report to the Board of Public Works for review, and the proposed removal must be posted for 30 days prior to removal in order to allow for public comment.  In addition to contacting the City Council Office if your Neighborhood Council has any concerns about the trees removal, board members will also be able to provide public comment with the Board of Public Works within the 30 days.

Please note that if your board has not taken official action on the tree(s) removal, board members can only speak in their individual capacity.

For more information about the tree removal process, click here for the information sheet and click here for the Tree Removal Permit Application.  For a list of the proposed removals, click here for the Tree Removal Notification System.

If you have any questions about this tree removal application list, please contact the Urban Forestry Department directly by calling 213-847-3077

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