Category: Sustainability

City of L.A. phasing out single-use plastic straws by 2021

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By 2021, all L.A. restaurants will phase out single-use plastic straws with NEW straws-upon-request policy.

LADWP Approves New Community Solar Power Program for Renters

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Pilot Program Targets Areas with Low Solar Penetration

LOS ANGELES (September 26, 2018) – Recognizing that a large segment of the city’s population is unable to benefit from solar power, the Board of Water and Power Commissioners voted September 25 to launch a new community solar program to improve solar equity for renters and to expand geographic diversity of solar projects in Los Angeles.

The pilot Shared Solar Program stems from LADWP’s Equity Metrics Data Initiative, which identified the need to expand the benefits of solar to renters as well as improve the geographic solar diversity in Los Angeles, bringing clean energy to more vulnerable communities.

The program will bring the economic and environmental benefits of this clean sustainable resource to customers who live in multifamily buildings and cannot participate in traditional solar programs. To broaden the geographic equity of local solar projects, the solar power will come in part from new projects built by LADWP in areas identified as having a lack of installed solar. These include economically disadvantaged communities as well as those designated by the city as “Clean Up Green Up” neighborhoods—Pacoima-Sun Valley in the East San Fernando Valley, Boyle Heights near downtown, and Wilmington in the Harbor area. If green-lighted by the City Council, LADWP expects to launch the program in January 2019.

“Every Angeleno should have access to clean energy, and you shouldn’t have to be a homeowner to be part of L.A.’s sustainable future,” said Mayor Eric Garcetti. “The Shared Solar Program will make that possible for more people in our communities — and progress today will keep us on the path to a tomorrow powered by 100 percent renewable energy.”

“The shared solar program gives my constituents in the Sixth District the right to access clean energy,” said Councilwoman Nury Martinez, Chair of the City Council’s Energy, Climate Change, and Environmental Justice Committee. “There should not be economic barriers to saving our environment. This program makes solar power affordable and also creates good, clean energy jobs that our community need most.”

Under the pilot program, participating customers will be able to purchase blocks of solar power—up to 100 kilowatt-hours (kWh) per month—at a 10-year fixed rate, enabling customers to better manage their electricity bill. LADWP has committed to providing up to 10 megawatts (MW) of solar power under the pilot program. LADWP will build new local solar on rooftops of LADWP and City-owned buildings, parking lots, and other structures. Part of the solar power for the program will also come from a large-scale 90 MW solar project due to be completed in 2019 in the Mojave Desert.

“Los Angeles is already America’s No. 1 Shining City, and now thousands more Angelenos will be able to enjoy the benefits of solar power,” said Mel Levine, President of the LADWP Board of Water and Power Commissioners. “At the same time, the program will help us achieve the Sustainable City pLAn local solar goals and our aggressive renewable energy targets.”

Expanding community solar has been an important component of Mayor Garcetti’s Sustainable City pLAn. Shared Solar is another example of LADWP’s commitment to delivering on the goals of that plan.

“We are absolutely committed to reducing economic barriers to solar power in Los Angeles, and so we are initially giving priority to customers who rent and live in areas that have not benefited from solar through other LADWP solar programs,” LADWP General Manager David H. Wright said.

Wright said the Board’s action today is just a first step. “The program’s end goal is to carve out a reduced rate for Shared Solar to make it affordable for income-qualified and disadvantaged customers,” he said. Toward that end, LADWP is working with community partners to obtain external funding, such as grants, to offset the cost of a discounted low-income rate. The Shared Solar program was crafted to be revenue neutral for non-participants, so that the proposed rate covers the cost of procuring, building, operating, and maintaining the solar projects along with program administration.

“What we won today is one of the nation’s first community solar programs that prioritizes reducing inequities while setting the course for a meaningful transition to renewables,” said Allison Mannos, Director of the RePowerLA Campaign at the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy (LAANE). “Since 2014, Repower LA has organized for a new clean energy future at LADWP that benefits low-income ratepayers and could grow over time.”

Shared Solar is part of LADWP’s umbrella of Community Solar Programs. LADWP launched the first Community Solar Program in February 2017—the pilot Solar Rooftop Program (SRP)—which also prioritizes customers who reside in areas of low solar penetration. Under this program, customers receive a fixed payment from LADWP to lease their roof space for a solar system that LADWP installs at no cost to the homeowner. Participating customers receive an annual $360 check for the year for 20 years. Currently, 43 homes have been approved for the Solar Rooftop Program, representing about a total of 110 kilowatts of new clean solar energy for customers who couldn’t install solar on their own.

LADWP is also developing a pilot Virtual Net Energy Metering Program (VNEM) as part of community solar. A VNEM program enables customers in multifamily housing to receive a credit on their bill for solar that is installed on their building. “LADWP’s efforts toward solar equity are growing and so is the Community Solar Program,” Wright said.

Under a Board resolution in June 2018, LADWP committed to accelerating the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from its power facilities while expanding energy efficiency and community solar programs that primarily benefit renters in multifamily housing. That action led to an increased investment of $10 million in Community Solar Programs to launch Shared Solar and started the development of the new VNEM Program.

http://www.ladwpnews.com/ladwp-approves-new-community-solar-power-program-for-renters/

Workshop: Great Green Space for a Climate-Smart LA

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Want to help your neighborhood maximize green space and be more climate resilient? Want to make the best and most equitable use of Measure A and Prop 68 funds for local parks?

Join us for a hands-on workshop with Fernando Cazares of the Trust for Public Land on how to make the most of your neighborhood green space—and add to it where it’s needed most. We’ll also have updates on our committee work on community oil drilling, trees, water, environmental health, and more, plus time to share what YOU are up to!

The Trust for Public Land has created a user-friendly tool to help city leaders and residents design, fund, and build climate-smart parks and green spaces where they can provide the most equitable and environmental bang for the buck.

Learn to use this tool to design and enhance your neighborhood “green infrastructure” serving four objectives: Connect (trails and transit lines to connect us), Cool (provide shade in key areas), Absorb (reduce flooding and recharge drinking water supplies while saving energy for water management), and Protect (strategically place green space to buffer cities from climate hazards). Check out a preview here!

BYOB—bring your own reusable water bottle or coffee mug

Connect with others to carpool to the event! https://www.groupcarpool.com/t/x5zas4

Saturday, August 25 from 10 am to 1 pm

Boyle Heights Technology Youth Center
1600 E 4th St
Los Angeles, CA 90033

RSVP at https://www.ncsa.la/great_green_space

Be a Food Waste Warrior, Join the Los Angeles Food Waste Grant Challenge

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The City of Los Angeles is proud to announce a new Food Waste Grant Challenge as part of the City’s ongoing efforts to divert waste from landfills. Over 40% of edible food moving through LA goes to waste, yet more than half a million Angelenos struggle with food insecurity. Wasted food is a social, environmental and economic problem. Combating food waste regenerates resources, saves money for households, and feeds people.

Grant proposals are due on December 8, 2017. Awards will be announced in mid-December, with a target start date of all projects on January 22, 2018. Project categories include food waste prevention, food donation, upcycled use (including animal feed or fuel) and composting.

For more details, visit http://dpw.lacity.org/blog/los-angeles-food-waste-grant-challenge

The Great LA River Clean Up

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April 16, 23, 30

Fifteen sites, three days, one River

This April come down to the River for Friends of the Los Angeles River’s 27th annual Great LA River CleanUp: La Gran Limpieza!

This year there is an urgent need for the 27th Annual Great Los Angeles River CleanUp. The dramatic El Niño swept through the watershed washing trash from surrounding areas into the channel which needs to be removed.

April is Earth Month you have three Saturdays – April 16th, 23rd, and 30th – and fifteen sites to choose from along the entire course of the LA River.

This Earth Month do your part – sign up for the CleanUp today!

To participate you must register and turn in a completed waiver at the CleanUp.

Dates and Locations

Upper River | April 16 | 9:00 am – 12:00 noon

Bette Davis Picnic Area | Glendale Narrows Riverwalk | Tujunga Wash @ Haines Canyon Channel | Sepulveda Basin Sports Complex

Mid River | April 23 | 9:00 am – 12:00 noon

Arroyo Seco Confluence | Fletcher Dr & Bowtie Parcel | The Frog Spot | Los Feliz Blvd | Marsh Park | Steelhead Park | Sunnynook Footbridge

Lower River | April 30 | 9:00 am – 12:00 noon

Compton Creek @ Artesia Station | Compton Creek @ Del Amo Station | Golden Shore Marine Reserve | Willow Street Estuary  Read more »

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